Thursday, October 4, 2018
07:00 – 08:00
Self-Care Activities
07:45 – 08:45
Chair: David K. Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Discussant: Susan Cadell, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
A) Benefits of Early Palliative Care in the Community: A Propensity Score Matched Cancer Cohort
Hsien Seow1, Lisa Barbera2, Kim McGrail3, Fred Burge4, Bev Lawson4, Dawn Guthrie5, Kelvin Chan2, Stuart Peacock3, Rinku Sutradhar2

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
4. Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
5. Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, ON, Canada

B) Efficacy of Advance Care Planning Interactive Web Sites and Workbooks to Improve Patient Engagement in Primary Care: The Results of Tool Evaluations

Michelle Howard1, Peter Allatt2, Carrie Bernard1,3, Doug Klein4, Dawn Elston1, Amy Tan5, Marissa Slaven1, Doris Barwich6, John J. You1, Rebecca Sudore7, Neha Arora1, Lawrence Mroz6, Becky Heyland8, Madiha Mueen4, Daren Heyland8,9

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. Bridgepoint Active Healthcare, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
4. University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
5. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
6. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
7. University of California, San Francisco, CA, United States
8. Kington General Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canada
9. Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada

C) Supporting Advance Care Planning in Dementia Palliative Care: Evaluation of the Family Carer Decision Support Intervention

Kevin Brazil1, Gillian Carter1, Chris Cardwell1, Mike Clarke1, Peter Hudson4, Katherine Froggatt2, Peter Passmore1, George Kernohan3

1. Queen's University, Belfast, Northern Ireland
2. Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
3. University of Ulster, Newtownabbey, Northern Ireland
4. University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

09:00 – 10:30
Chair : Bernard J. Lapointe, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

Is the Culture of Caring for the Dying Affected by Contemporary Society's Rejection of Limits?

(Presented in French)F=>E

Luce Des Aulniers, Anthropologist, Emeritus Professor, Faculty of Communication, Founder of Interdisciplinary Studies on Death, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada


Quite naturally, the palliative milieux are impregnated by the trends that give our society meaning. In what way does the widespread “limitless” movement influence us, especially as we face the final limitation of death? What are its impacts on the place of refuge that our care creates? In return, what can the palliative culture contribute to the worlds that helped make us and that call to us?

The Palliative Approach’s Contribution to Traditional Medicine: A Paradigm Shift in Care?

(Presented in French)F=>E

Sadek Beloucif, Professor of Anesthesiology & Critical Care Medicine, Sorbonne Paris-Cité University (Avicenne Hospital, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris), Paris, France


From the notion of hospitality, which is regaining its place in the hospital setting, to that of patient empowerment, Professor Sadek Beloucif will be covering his favorite topics. A proponent of evidence-based medicine that is also patientcentered, he will notably discuss the relationship between spirituality and end of life, with emphasis on the importance of establishing connections between the concepts of “cure” and “care”.

10:30 – 11:00 – BREAK

11:00 – 15:30

WHAT TO CHOOSE FROM:


At 11:00 participants may attend either the Special Seminar “Hypnotic Language and Suggestions at Bedside” (D01/E01) which continues until 15:30; the Special Seminar “Scientific Day of the RQSPAL" (RQS1/RQS2/RQS3) which continues until 17:30; or choose from a selection of symposia, workshops and proffered paper sessions at 11:00 (D02-D13), and at 14:00 (E02-E13).

Sylvain Néron, Jewish General Hospital, Segal Cancer Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
Participants will practice the language of suggestion directed at: • Relieving suffering resulting from summative distress within total pain in the social, emotional, psychological and spiritual domains; • Reframing death anxiety and hope, being mindful of the sufferer's perception of time.

Limited to 20 participants, health professionals Introductory: no prior training in clinical hypnosis required Interactive pedagogy: skills to practice in dyads

11:00 – 12:30

D01

Hypnotic Language and Suggestions at Bedside (Part 1)



14:00 – 15:30

E01

Hypnotic Language and Suggestions at Bedside (Part 2)

Organizers and Co-Chairs :
Pierre Gagnon,
Director of the RQSPAL; CHU de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
François Tardif, Coordinator of the RQSPAL, Québec, QC, Canada


The Réseau québécois de recherche en soins palliatifs et de fin de vie (RQSPAL – Québec Palliative and End-of-Life Care Research Network) is a new network for research on palliative care in Québec. Its mission is to contribute meaningfully, through research and knowledge transfer activities, to improving the quality, accessibility and fairness of care for individuals suffering from any incurable, potentially fatal disease, as well as their loved ones. Over the course of the day, we will report on the advancement of some of the research being carried out by RQSPAL members on the subject of palliative and end-of-life care in Québec.
Conducted in French. Simultaneous interpretation provided for RQS1 and RQS2 only.
All are welcome.

11:00 – 12:30

RQS1
F=>E

SYMPOSIUM 1: BEING CLOSE TO PATIENTS

Moderator: Robin Cohen, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
(Presented in French)



A) Evaluation of an Intervention to Improve Supportive Care for Family Caregivers of Patients with Lung Cancer: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

Michèle Aubin1,2,3, Lucie Vézina4, René Verreault2, Sébastien Simard5, Lise Tremblay1,2,3, Jean-François Desbiens1, Serge Dumont1,3, Lise Fillion1,3, Joyce Dogba Maman1,3, Pierre Gagnon1,3

1. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Centre de recherche de l'Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada
3. Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada
4. Unité de médecine familiale-Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
5. Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada



B) How Does the Bereavement Experiences of Seniors Living in Residence Affect Their Thinking About Their Own End of Life?

Valérie Bourgeois-Guérin, Valérie Millette, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada



14:00 – 15:30

RQS2
F=>E

SYMPOSIUM 2: DECISION MAKING AT END OF LIFE

Moderator: Serge Dumont, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
(Presented in French)



A) Optimizing Communication with Parents During and After an Unsuccessful Neonatal Resuscitation: Parent and Provider Perspectives

Annie Janvier, Marie-Hélène Lizotte, Keith Barrington, Thomas Pennaforte, Ahmed Moussa, Christian Lachance, Maia Sureau, Serge Sultan, Université de Montréal, Hôpital Sainte-Justine, Montréal, Québec, Canada



B) End-of-Life Rituals and Post-mortem Care

Dominique Mercille1, Diane Tapp1,2

1. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Centre de recherche de l’Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec – Université Laval (CRIUCPQ-UL), Québec, QC, Canada



C) Comparing Quebec Stakeholders’ Perspectives on Whether Medical Aid in Dying Should Be Made Accessible to Incompetent Patients, in Some Circumstances

Gina Bravo, Marcel Arcand, Université de Sherbrooke, et Centre de recherche sur le vieillissement, Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada

16:00 – 17:30

RQS3

SYMPOSIUM 3: SYMPOSIUM 3: RECHERCHE CLINIQUE ET GESTION DES SYMPTÔMES

Modératrices : Josée Savard et Lynn Gauthier, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
(Presented in French)
Note: this session is at the same time as Plenary 3.



A) Prévalence et facteurs de risque des idéations suicidaires chez des patients atteints d’un cancer tête et cou: Étude longitudinale

Melissa Henry1,2, Zeev Rosberger1,2, Lia Bertrand1, Christina Klassen1,2, Michael Hier1,2, Anthony Zeitouni1,3, Karen Kost1,3, Alex Mlynarek1,2, Keith Richardson1,3, Martin Black1,2, Christina MacDonald2, Gabrielle Chartier2, Saul Frenkiel1,2,3

1. Université McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Hôpital général juif, Montréal, QC, Canada
3. Centre universitaire de santé McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada



B) Une étude pilote avec méthodologie mixte en vue d’une étude de phase III

Bruno Gagnon1, Maman Joyce Dogba2

1. Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada



C) Élaboration d’un programme de bien-être au travail d’intervenants en maison de soins palliatifs (SP) : Phase 1 : identification des facteurs de risque et de protection

Lise Fillion, Manon Truchon, Alice Girouard, Estelle Houguet, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada

11:00 – 12:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (D01 or RQS1) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS OR SYMPOSIA (D02 – D13)
D01 FULL
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Hypnotic Language and Suggestions at Bedside

(Part 1)

D02
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Funeral Rituals, Bereavement and Advance Care Planning

Co-Chairs: Johanne de Montigny, Psychologist, Montréal, QC, Canada
Chris MacKinnon, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada



A) The Construction of Legacy: Funeral Rituals and the Reaffirmation of Continuing Bonds

Robert A. Neimeyer, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN, United States

This interactive workshop will discuss the role of commemoration practices in the aftermath of loss with the goal of highlighting the continuing bond that families seek with the dead as they integrate the loss into the ongoing story of their lives. Participants will learn three critical functions served by effective eulogies and be guided in conducting interviews that will draw forth rich material to craft into memorable celebrations of the deceased person's life story.



B) When It Matters Most: How Funeral Directors Can Support Palliative Care and Advanced Care Planning

John Laframboise, Kelly Funeral Homes, Arbor Memorial Inc., Ottawa, ON, Canada

Has advanced care planning caught up with Canada’s changing culture and faith land - scape? Learn from a variety of applied examples of how funeral directors and palliative care professionals can work together for all clients, providing resourceful guidance in end-of-life planning and bereavement support.

D03
SYMPOSIUM: THE CANADIAN PARTNERSHIP AGAINST CANCER

Working with First Nations, Inuit and Métis Patients and Families to Deliver Culturally Competent Palliative Care

Chair: Raquel Shaw Moxam, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada



Pam Tobin, Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada
Leah Norgrove, Vancouver Island Health Authority, Saanichton, BC, Canada
Vanessa Eldridge, Mary Potter Hospice, Elsdon, Porirua, New Zealand
Heather Hastings, Tsartlip (W̱JOȽEȽP), First Nation, Brentwood Bay, BC, Canada



In response to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action, and due to the lack of organized palliative care services available to First Nations, Inuit and Métis patients and families, efforts are underway to provide culturally appropriate palliative care. International promising practices and Canadian initiatives will be discussed.

D04
PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care for Young Adults

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Let's Talk: Decision-Making Conversations with Young Adults with Serious Conditions

Karen Cook1, Camara vanBreemen2, Jennifer Kryworuchko3, Kim Bergeron1, Joanie Maynard3

1. Athabasca University, Athabasca, AB, Canada
2. Canuck Place Children's Hospice, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

B) Life-Limiting Illnesses, Palliative Care, and Aging: A Review of Current Models and Discourses and How They Limit Young Adults Aging Well

Julie Burk, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

C) Palliative and Supportive Care for Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients

Ahmed al-Awamer1,2, Pamela Mosher1,2

1. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, ON, Canada

D05
STUDENT FORUM – Moral Distress Experienced by Palliative Care Trainees: Difficult Encounters in Clinical Practice and Research

Franco Carnevale, McGill University, Montréal, Qc, Canada

Moral distress refers to a deep malaise resulting from feeling impeded from doing what one thinks is right. There is recognition of moral distress among clinical and research trainees, linked to their position of limited power and authority. In this discussion, features of moral distress will be described, as well as barriers to action that are known to provoke it. These will be related to the experiences of trainees in professional education or research programs. Potential strategies for addressing moral distress will be discussed.

D06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Research

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) 'An Interview is Not a Consultation': the Dual Role of Clinician-Researcher – Lessons from an Ethnographic Study Exploring Rural Patients' and Family Caregivers' Perspectives on the 'Good Death'

Suzanne Rainsford, Christine Phillips, Australian National University, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, NSW, Australia

B) "What Does That Word Even Really Mean?" – Exploring the Relationship Between Ethnography and Hospital Palliative Care

Marian Krawczyk, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland

C) Narrative Ethnography: Exploring Pain and Suffering in Palliative Care Settings

Michael Atkinson, Kristina Smith, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

D) Building Better Research in Palliative Care by Bridging the Epistemological- Ontological Divide

Sonya S. Lowe1, Claudia Gamondi2, Sarah G. Brearley3

1. Alberta Health Services, AB, Canada
2. Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Vaud, Switzerland
3. Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

D07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Suffering and Healing

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Suffering in Advanced Cancer: A Randomized Control Trial of a Narrative Intervention

Lucille Marchand1, Meg Wise2

1. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States
2. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, United States

B) Healing Experiences in All Life Stressors (HEALS): A Novel Tool for Assessment of Psycho-Social-Spiritual Healing

Rezvan Ameli, María José Luna, Julia Cheringal, Ninet Sinaii, Jennie Gilbhrighde, Ann Berger, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

C) Gender Differences in Psycho-Social-Spiritual Aspects of Healing

Rezvan Ameli, María José Luna, Julia Cheringal, Ninet Sinaii, Jennie Gilbhrighde, Ann Berger, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

D) "Hey, you're a big hero demonstrate your strength" – Work with Male Hematological Patients in Sha'are Zedek Medical Center

Liora Gov-Ari de Vries, Sha'are Zedek Hospital, Jerusalem, Israel

D08

A) Whole-Person Communication Is More than Just Words: The Challenges of Teaching Communication Skills

Elaine Stevens1, Elizabeth Clark2,3, Bridget Johnston4, Sharon Ruckley5

1. University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland
2. Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, United States
3. Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, NY, United States
4. University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland
5. Provincial Integrated Palliative Care Programme, PEI, Canada

This interactive workshop will provide examples of how attitudes and behaviors impact on whole-person palliative care and how communication skills training can be hampered in everyday practice. Practical solutions, will be identified and their introduction into clinical practice deliberated. Such solutions will add to participants’ communication skills tool boxes.

B) The Healing Impact of Attunement and Deep Listening: Practices for Clinicians

Carla Cheatham, University of Maryland College Park, Maryland, United States; Seminary of the Southwest, and Carla Cheatham Consulting Group, Austin, TX, United States

D09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care in Developing Countries

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Looking for Control at the End of Life Through the Bond: A Grounded Theory on the Hospital Discharge Process in Palliative Care

Gloria Mabel Carrillo, Sonia Carreño, Rocio Lopez, Olga Gómez, Diana Cárdenas, Mauricio Arias, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Cundinamarca, Colombia

B) Disease and Symptom Characteristics of Inpatient Older Persons in a Regional Referral Hospital in Uganda

Esther Taaka1, Mackuline Atieno2, Stephen Obbo1, James Wandeeba1, Meg O'Brien3, Emmanuel Luyirika2, Sarah Nandutu1

1. Mbale Regional Referral Hospital, Mbale, Uganda; 2. African Palliative Care Association, Kampala, Uganda; 3. American Cancer Society, United States

C) A Managerial Report: Establishment of Cancer Home Care Network in a Metropolis – Tehran

Suzanne Hojjat-Assari1,6, Ahmad Reza Pourghaderi2,6, Mohammad Reza Sharbafchi3,6, Davood Niki6, Matin Seifolahi6, Abdolrahim Hazini6, Pooneh Pirjani6, Sara Samiee4,6, Hassan Abolghasemi5,6

1. French Transfusion Organization, Paris, France
2. National University of Singapore, Singapore
3. Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4. Shariati Hospital, Tehran, Iran
5. Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
6. ALA Cancer Prevention and Control Center (MACSA), Tehran, Iran

D) Enhancing Access to Palliative Care Globally: 19 Years of Global Partnerships

Lacey N. Ahern1, Mark M. Murray1, John Mastrojohn III2

1. Global Partners in Care, Mishawaka, IN, United States
2. National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization, Alexandria, VA, United States

D10

A) #Benzopioid: Is It Time for this Power Couple to Break Up?

Tanya J. Uritsky1, Kashelle Lockman2

1. Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States
2. University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States

Participants will compare personal attitudes and clinical experience managing symptoms with benzodiazepines and opioids to the evidence on their risks and benefits through simulated patient cases and lively debate.

B) Calculating Conversations: Recent Data that Informs Opioid Conversion Calculations

Mary Lynn McPherson1, Mellar P. Davis2

1. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States
2. Geisinger Health, Danville, PA, United States

Patients with serious illness frequently require switching from one opioid to a different opioid. This workshop will present recent data that informs best practices in opioid switching, safely and effectively.

D11
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Ethical Issues

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Coming Out of Hiding: A Nursing Focus on Medical Assistance in Dying (MAiD)

Madeleine Greig1,David Wright2, Barbara Pesut1

1. University of British Columbia, Okanagan, BC, Canada
2. University of Ottawa, ON, Canada

In this workshop, four Canadian nurse researchers will draw upon evidence from a literature synthesis, and a study conducted with palliative care nurses in Canada, to explore the experiential and ethical implications of MAiD for nurses.

B) Postcards from the Edge: Nursing Those Who Suffer in This New Era of MAiD

Kathleen Baba Willison1,2, Joseph Pellizzari1,2, Joshua Shadd2,3, Anne Woods1,2, Marilyn Swinton2, Cait O'Donnell4, Alexandra Farag2, Andrea Frolic2,3

1. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3. Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada

C) Health Care Professionals Working in Palliative Care and Assisted Dying: Experiences of Different International Models

Claudia Gamondi1,2, Sheri Mila Gerson3, Deborah Lewis3, Sheila Payne3

1. Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland
2. Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona, Switzerland
3. Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

D12
PROFFERED PAPERS – Spirituality

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Rising Above: Spirituality Among Family Caregivers in a Hospice Setting

Nasreen Lalani, Wendy Duggleby, Joanne Olson, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

B) What Does Spiritual Wellbeing Mean to You? Understandings of International Participants in the Validation Study for the EORTC QLQ-SWB32: An EORTC Measure of Spiritual Wellbeing for Palliative Care Patients

Bella Vivat1, Esther Law1, Teresa Young2, Juan Arraras3, Kath Black4, Fran Boyle5, Anne Bredart6, Anna Costantini7, M Elisa Irarrazaval8, Mariana Navarro9, Sepideh Omidvari10, Gudrun Rohde11, Samantha Serpentini12, Nigel Spry13, Julie Winstanley5, Grace Yang14

1. University College London, London, United Kingdom
2. Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex, United Kingdom
3. Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
4. St Gemma's Hospice, Leeds, United Kingdom
5. Patricia Ritchie Centre for Cancer Care, University of Sydney, North Sydney, NSW, Australia
6. Institut Curie, Paris, France
7. Sant'Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy
8. Centro Los Junco, Santiago, Chile
9. Centro de Apoyo para la Atención Integral, Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia, Mexico
10. Iranian Institute for Health Sciences Research, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
11. University of Agder and Sorlandet Hospital, Kristiansand, Norway
12. Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV – IRCCS, Padua, Italy
13. University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA, Australia
14. National Cancer Centre Singapore, Lien Centre for Palliative Care, Singapore

C) A Contemporary Rewrite of Spiritual Language: Poetics for Living and Dying

Lana Kim McGeary, Montreal Neurological Hospital ALS Clinic and West Island Palliative Care Center, Montréal, QC, Canada

D13

A) Taking Medication Management to the Next Level: Making the Case for Clinical Pharmacists as Integral Palliative Care Team Members

Kathryn Walker1,2, Christopher Kearney1

1. MedStar Health, Columbia, MD, United States
2. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States

In this interactive session, we will highlight our experience as the first health system to adopt PC pharmacists as a standard team member and their role on our transdisciplinary teams.

B) Excellence in Interprofessional Teamwork: Functions, Dynamics, Boundaries, and Conflict

Susan Blacker1,2, Shirley Otis-Green3,4, Carla Cheatham5,6,7

1. Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Collaborative Caring, Toluca Lake, CA, United States
4. Coalition of Compassionate Care of California, Sacramento, CA, United States
5. University of Maryland, College Park, MD, United States
6. Seminary of the Southwest, Austin, TX, United States
7. Carla Cheatham Consulting Group, Austin, TX, United States

Effective interprofessional teams enhance patient and provider experience and protect against workplace burnout and compassion fatigue. Participants will consider their team’s current level of functioning and strategies for improvement.

RQS1
F=>E
SPECIAL SEMINAR: SCIENTIFIC DAY OF THE RQSPAL

SYMPOSIUM 1: Being Close to Patients

Moderator: Robin Cohen, Jewish General Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

(Presented in French)

12:30 – 14:00

A special time dedicated to viewing the posters and meeting the authors.

Lunch Boxes

Enjoy the lunchtime and have time to eat your lunch.

Lunch boxes may be purchased for the lunchtime activities Wednesday through Friday.
14:00 – 15:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (E01 or RQS2) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS OR SYMPOSIA (E02 – E13)
E01 FULL
SPECIAL SEMINAR:

Hypnotic Language and Suggestions at Bedside

(Part 2)

E02
E=>F
SYMPOSIUM:

Advance Care Planning (ACP) and Hospice Palliative Care (HPC) Progress in Canada: An Update Panel

Sharon Baxter1, Chad Hammond1, Cari Borenko Hoffman2

1. Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Fraser Health Authority, Surrey, BC, Canada

This panel will cover recent achievements and opportunities in ACP and HPC in Canada. The first part will cover CHPCA partnerships that have completed a number of ACP projects while the second part will bring participants up to date on where HPC is in Canada with an advocacy perspective.

E03
SYMPOSIUM:

TALKING CIRCLES: Addressing Cancer Illness in Canada’s Indigenous Communities

Organized in collaboration with the Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association and the Assembly of First Nations

Lea Bill1, Marilee A Nowgesic1, and Chair, Chiefs Committee on Health2

1. Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Assembly of First Nations, Ottawa, ON, Canada

The Canadian Indigenous Nurses Association of Canada (CINA) and the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) have identified a ‘National Indigenous Healthcare Provider Organization’ (NIHPO) collaboration to address palliative care in Canada’s Indigenous communities. NIHPO is made up of Indigenous health professionals who will support healthcare provider knowledge and expertise in delivering culturally appropriate healthcare, and connect with healthcare providers. Elders and Knowledge Holders have encouraged the bringing together of national Indigenous Healthcare Providers to improve health outcomes. A multi-disciplinary partnership approach is needed. An Indigenous Knowledge Translation Framework in Cancer Care will support culturally competent and safe services for Indigenous people and culturally appropriate principles, policy, health education resources, tools and expertise.

E04

A) Supporting Children Grieving the Dying or Death of a Family Member

Andrea Warnick2,1, Shelly Cory1, Suzanne O'Brien3, Donna L. Schuurman11, Christopher MacKinnon4, Lysa Toye5, Camara van Breemen6, Candace Ray7, Antonietta Petti8, Susan Cadell9, Marney Thompson10, Fred Nelson1, Stephanie Rabenstein12, Joan Hamilton13, C. Elizabeth Dougherty14, Julie Szasz

1. Canadian Virtual Hospice, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
2. Andrea Warnick Consulting, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Hope and Cope, Montréal, QC, Canada
4. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
5. Dr. Jay Children's Grief Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada
6. Canuck Place Children's Hospice, Vancouver, BC, Canada
7. The Lighthouse for Grieving Children, Oakville, ON, Canada
8. Le Phare Enfants et Familles, Montréal, QC, Canada
9. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
10. Victoria Hospice, Victoria, BC, Canada
11. The Dougy Center for Grieving Children & Families, Portland, OR, United States
12. Children’s Hospital at London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada
13. Nova Scotia Health Authority, Halifax, NS, Canada
14. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

This session will highlight practical tips and strategies, as well as the new on-line resource KidsGrief.ca, for supporting children grieving the dying or death of someone in their life.

B) Serious Illness in Pediatrics – A Guide for Conducting Difficult Discussion

Camara van Breemen, Lanna Olson, Canuck Place Children's Hospice, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Parents of seriously ill children value honest communication, transparency, and shared decision-making. However, it has been identified in many pediatric settings that communication practices need to be improved. Canuck Place Children’s Hospice adapted a tool widely used for adults – the Serious Illness Conversation Guide (SICG) – for use in pediatrics. This workshop explores the adaptation process, an overview of the use of the guide and preliminary results from a qualitative study.

E05

A) Beyond Just Talk: Problematizing the 'Action' in Action Research, Based on the DöBra Research Program

Carol Tishelman1,2,Ida Goliath1,Olav Lindqvist1,3

1. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2. Karolinska University Hospital, Center for Innovation, Stockholm, Sweden
3. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

This workshop involves critical discussion about ‘action’ in action-oriented end-of-life (EoL) research with participants, triggered by reflections and experiences from six projects in the Swedish new public-health-based DöBra research program.

B) Improving Advance Care Planning for Frail Older Canadians

John You1, Doris Barwich2, Brian Clark3, Gloria Gutman4, Michelle Howard1, Dev Jayaraman5, Sharon Kaasalainen1, Daniel Kobewka6, Jessica Simon7, Tamara Sussman5, Marilyn Swinton1, Amy Tan7, Robin Urquhart8, Martha Winhall9

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. BC Centre for Palliative Care, New Westminster, BC, Canada
3. Patient Advisors Network, Virtual Network
4. Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC, Canada
5. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
6. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
7. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
8. Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS, Canada
9. Patient/Family Advisor, Canada

This interactive workshop will explore challenges to and tools for advance care planning with older adults with frailty in 3 different care settings (primary care, hospital, long-term care). This research is funded by Canadian Frailty Network, which is supported by the Government of Canada through the Networks of Centres of Excellence (NCE) program.

E06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Self-Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) The Professional Working Group – Understanding Burnout and Discussing Experiences Using a Professional Working Group to Build Community and Make Work-life Sustainable

Warren Lewin1, Nina Horvath2, Bonnie Chen3, Joshua Jones4

1. University Health Network, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. North York General Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Kaiser Permanente, Oakland, CA, United States
4. University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, United States

B) BUPPALHO Study: Burnout Among Public Hospital Doctors Engaged in Cancer Palliative Care in Hong Kong

Raymond Kam Wing Woo1,2, Tracy Wai Tsan Chen1,3, Benjamin Hon Wai Cheng1,4, Hon Cheung Fan1,5, Sing Hung Lo1,3, Alice Ka Wai Mok1,7, Jeffrey Sheung Ching Ng1,8, Steven Wai Kwan Siu1,9, Inda Sung Soong1,6, Kam Hung Wong1,10, Po Tin Lam1,11

1. Hong Kong Society of Palliative Medicine, Hong Kong
2. Caritas Medical Centre, Hong Kong
3. Haven of Hope Sister Annie Skau Holistic Care Centre, Hong Kong
4. Tuen Mun Hospital, Hong Kong
5. Ruttonjee & Tang Shiu Kin Hospital, Hong Kong
6. Pamela Youde Nethersole Eastern Hospital, Hong Kong
7. Shatin Hospital, Hong Kong
8. Haven of Hope Hospital, Hong Kong
9. Queen Mary Hospital, Hong Kong
10. Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Hong Kong
11. United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong

C) A Qualitative Study of Healthcare Professionals' Resilience in Two Different Cultures – Do Canadian and Japanese Palliative Care Physicians Perceive the Concept of Resilience Differently?

Shizuma Tsuchiya1, Yusuke Takamiya1, Linda Snell2, Alenoush Saroyan2

1. Showa University, Tokyo, Japan
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

D) When the Professional Becomes Personal: Navigating Dual Roles During a Loved One's Serious Illness

Shirley Otis-Green3,4, Carla Cheatham5,6,7, Susan Blacker1,2

1. Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Collaborative Caring, Toluca Lake, CA, United States
4. Coalition of Compassionate Care of California, Sacramento, CA, United States
5. University of Maryland, College Park, MD, United States
6. Seminary of the Southwest, Austin, TX, United States
7. Carla Cheatham Consulting Group, Austin, TX, United States

E07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Communication: Important Conversatiions

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Concordance of Care with Goals of Care: Caring Through Conversations

Cory Ingram, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States


B) Talking About the Meaning of Life in Code-status Conversations Between Elderly Hospitalized Patients and Their Physicians

Anca-Cristina Sterie, Etienne Rochat, Eve Rubli Truchard, Ralf J. Jox, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne, Switzerland


C) Decisional Control Preferences in the Hispanic Population in the Bronx

Jhosselini Cardenas-Mori1,2, Elizabeth Chuang1,2

1. Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, United States
2. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States

E08
WORKSHOP / PROFFERED PAPERS – Spirituality

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute proffered papers, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) “It'll Take a Miracle!” – The Role of the Palliative Care Clinician When Engaging Families Who Are Hoping for a Miracle

Rachel Rusch, Children's Hospital Los Angeles, CA, United States

What is the role of the provider when patients hope for a miracle? Case studies and culturally insightful literature identify challenges and innovative communication to engage with this compelling expectation.

B) Should We Say We Are From Hospice? The Spiritual Implications of Diagnosis Concealment

Aaron Klink, Pruitt Hospice, Durham, NC, United States

C) Is Spiritual Care the Hospital's Business? A Qualitative Study on Patients' Preferences about the Integration of Spirituality in Palliative Care Units (PCU)

Nicolas Pujol1,2, Danièle Leboul1, Chloé Prodhomme2, Frédéric Guirimand1

1. Maison médicale Jeanne Garnier, Paris, France
2. Université catholique de Lille, Centre d'éthique médicale, Lille, France.

E09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Hospice / Community Based Palliative Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Spare Ronnie From Drowning: Reducing Heart Failure Symptoms in Hospice Patients Utilizing a New Guideline-Directed Medical Therapy Algorithm

Charles Newton, HOPE HealthCare, Fort Myers, FL, United States

B) Impact of Palliative Home Care Use on Appropriateness of Care and Costs at the End of Life: A Nationwide Quasi-experimental Retrospective Case-controlled Study

Arno Maetens1, Kim Beernaert1, Robrecht de Schreye1, Kristof Faes1,2, Koen Pardon1, Lieven Annemans2, Luc Deliens1,3,Kirsten Hermans1, Joachim Cohen1

1. Vrije Universiteit Brussel & Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
2. Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
3. Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium

C) Hospice Care for Patients with Dementia in the United States: A Longitudinal Cohort Study

Aline De Vleminck1, R. Sean Morrison2, Diane E. Meier2, Melissa D. Aldridge2

1. Free University of Brussels, Brussels, Belgium
2. Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, United States

D) Supporting Family Physicians in Providing Community-Based Primary Palliative Care

Amy Tan, Ron Spice, Sharlette Dunn, Aynharan Sinnarajah, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

E10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Nursing

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Innovative Education for the Development of Competencies in the Care of People at the End of Life and Their Family Caregivers

Olga Gómez, Gloria Carrillo, Sonia Carreño, Lorena Chaparro, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia

B) Supportive Care Needs in Thai Women with Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy: A Qualitative Study

Supanee Klungrit, Sureeporn Thanasilp, Chanokporn Jitpanya, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand

C) Use of the InterRAI Palliative Care (PC) Instrument: An Active Mediation Role for PC Nurses in their Professional Experience

Emmanuel Bagaragaza1,2,3,4, Frédéric Guirimand1, Danièle Leboul1

1. Maison Médicale Jeanne Garnier, Paris, France
2. Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM), Villejuif, France
3. Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines, Montigny Le Bretonneux, France
4. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

D) Interprofessional Clinical Reasoning: Explaining How Interprofessional Teams Make Shared Decisions in Advanced Cancer and Cachexia Care

Monica P. Parmar1,2, R. Thomas Jagoe1,2, Margaret Purden1,2, Matthew Hunt2, S. Robin Cohen1,2

1. Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

E11

A) Opioids and Breathlessness: Looking Both Ways

Mellar Davis, Geisinger Medical Center, Danville, PA, United States

Opioids are commonly used to relieve dyspnea but have drawbacks including worsened sleep disordered breathing and increased mortality. We will review the risks, benefits and options to mitigate risks.

B) Confusing Times: Unraveling the Complexities of Delirium Management in Palliative Care

Shirley H. Bush1,2,3,4, Elise Skinner4, Bruno Gagnon5, Peter G. Lawlor1,2,3,4

1. University of Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada
4. Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada
5. Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada

This workshop on delirium management will demonstrate how to bring recent research to the bedside, including strategies that interprofessional team members can implement to improve the care of delirious patients.

E12

A) Understanding Countertransference in Palliative Care

Mark Heiland1, Marcos Montagnini2, Linda Blum3

1. Siteman Cancer Center, Saint Louis, MO, United States
2. The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
3. California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, United States

Countertransference is commonly experienced by healthcare providers. This workshop will allow participants to better understand the concept of countertransference and to explore strategies to work with and through it in hospice and palliative care settings.

B) When Helping Hurts: Iatrogenic Consequences/Effects on the Patient-Caregiver Dyad

Katie Jones, Kysa Christie, Lara Michal Skarf, Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, United States

Patient and Caregiver burden can influence many aspects of the care of palliative care patients. Using an interactive tool we will review strategies for assessing and intervening in this burden.

E13
ATELIER : Arts et Humanités

A) Et si Ricoeur faisait partie de notre équipe de Soins Palliatifs ?

Louise La Fontaine, Maison Victor Gadbois, Saint-Mathieu-de-Beloeil, QC, Canada

Au cours de cette présentation, nous poserons un regard sur ce qui unit une pratique de qualité, telle qu’exprimée par les soignants, et la pensée de Ricoeur, dans une perspective réflexive.

B) Analyse de l'impact des séances d’art-thérapie musicale « Pansement Schubert »

Claire Oppert, Jean-Marie Gomas, Unité fonctionnelle douleur chronique et soins palliatifs, CHU Sainte Perine, Paris, France

Cette étude clinique nous permet d’analyser dans quelle mesure la présence de la musique vivante (violoncelle) au cours d’un soin infirmier est un facteur bénéfique associant diminution de la douleur et de l’anxiété du patient en fin de vie et bien-être psychologique du soignant et des proches.

RQS2
F=>E
SPECIAL SEMINAR: SCIENTIFIC DAY OF THE RQSPAL

SYMPOSIUM 2: Decision Making at End of Life

Moderator: Serge Dumont, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada

(Presented in French)

15:30 – 16:00 – BREAK

16:00 – 17:30
CHOICE OF THE PLENARY (PL3) OR SPECIAL SEMINAR (RQS3)
Modératrices : Josée Savard et Lynn Gauthier, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
(Presented in French)
Note: this session is at the same time as Plenary 3.
A) Prévalence et facteurs de risque des idéations suicidaires chez des patients atteints d’un cancer tête et cou: Étude longitudinale
Melissa Henry1,2Zeev Rosberger1,2, Lia Bertrand1, Christina Klassen1,2, Michael Hier1,2, Anthony Zeitouni1,3, Karen Kost1,3, Alex Mlynarek1,2, Keith Richardson1,3, Martin Black1,2, Christina MacDonald2, Gabrielle Chartier2, Saul Frenkiel1,2,3
1. Université McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2. Hôpital général juif, Montréal, QC, Canada;
3. Centre universitaire de santé McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada
B) Une étude pilote avec méthodologie mixte en vue d’une étude de phase III
Bruno Gagnon1Maman Joyce Dogba2
1. Centre de recherche du CHU de Québec, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
C) Élaboration d’un programme de bien-être au travail d’intervenants en maison de soins palliatifs (SP) : Phase 1 : identification des facteurs de risque et de protection
Lise Fillion, Manon Truchon, Alice Girouard, Estelle Houguet, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada