Wednesday, October 19, 2016
07:00 – 08:00
Self-Care Activities
08:30 – 10:00
Chair : Bernard Lapointe, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

The Importance of Music in Our Lives

Kent Nagano, Music Director, Orchestre Symphonique de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada


As Victor Hugo wrote: Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent. Music plays a fundamental role in our lives, from the lullabies sung to us when we were infants, to our songs that celebrated love, to the sheer joy that we experience when listening to Mozart or The Beatles. Music creates strong emotions and triggers memories. Music allows us to build bridges and dreams of hope. At the opening plenary Maestro Kent Nagano, Music Director of the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, in conversation with author and caregiver Louise Penny, will explore the essential role of music in our lives and in the care of our patients.

On Pain: Historical Reflections

Joanna Bourke, Professor of History, Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, School of Social Sciences, History, and Philosophy, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom


Pain has a history. Pain experiences do not emerge naturally from physiological processes, but always in negotiation with social worlds. As such, they are historically constituted and reconstituted in relation to language, social and environmental interactions, and bodily comportment. This plenary explores the different ways people have attempted to communicate their pain from the eighteenth century to the present.

10:00 – 11:00 – BREAK and POSTER WALKS 

11:00 – 17:00

WHAT TO CHOOSE FROM:


At 11:00 participants may attend either :

  • the Special Seminar “Fundamentals of Palliative Care Nursing” (A01/B01/C01),
  • or the Special Seminar “Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care” (A02, B02, C02), both of which continue until 17:00;
  • or alternatively choose from a selection of workshops at 11:00 (A03-A12), at 14:00 (B03-B12) and at 16:00 (C03-C12).

Organizers and Co-Chairs :
Vasiliki Bitzas, SMBD Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
Maryse Bouvette, Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada
David Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
A series of presentations which highlight the fundamental value of palliative care nursing in intensive care settings, as advocates during periods of transitions in goals of care and as key facilitators to communication.

(This Seminar will be conducted in English and French with simultaneous interpretation.)

11:00 – 12:30

A01

A) The Integration of Palliative and End-of-Life Care in an Intensive Care Unit

(presented in French)

Lise Fillion, Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada

B) Nursing Care of Patients Dying in the ICU

David Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Brandi Vanderspank-Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

B01

A) Transitions to Palliative Care: Experiences of Hospitalized Patients

Vasiliki (Bessy) Bitzas, S.M.B.D. Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada

B) Improving Nurse to Nurse Transfer of Accountability in a Palliative Care Unit

Victoria McLean1, Slawomir Zulawnik1, Fred Parmanand1,2

1. St. Michael's Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Bridgepoint Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Nurses' Experiences of Patient Death: An Interpretive Description

Christy Konietzny1, Sharon Kaasalainen1, Jenny Ploeg1, Nancy Carter1, Lori Schindel Martin2

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. Ryerson University, Toronto, ON, Canada

16:00 – 17:00

C01

A) “The Therapeutic Self”: An Evolving Communication Tool

(presented in French)

Maryse Bouvette, Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Chair: Andrée Néron, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Hôpital Notre-Dame, Montréal, QC, Canada
Organizer: Bonica Orng, McGill University Health Centrel, Montréal, QC, Canada

Effective symptom control in palliative care remains a challenge for caregivers seeking to ensure maximum patient comfort. This seminar will feature a series of presentations by leading experts who will discuss the latest research in understanding pain and current issues in medication options.

This continuing education activity has been accredited by the Order of Pharmacists of Quebec for 12 continuing education credits for pharmacists who attend the entire session.

11:00 – 12:30

A02

Let It Go! Let It Go! Setting Medications Free in Advanced Illness

Mary Lynn McPherson, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States

Patients with advanced illnesses are frequently taking medications that could be considered futile or irrational. Participants in this presentation will learn about a systematic process to evaluate the benefits and burdens of medications in advanced illness, and recommend strategies for discontinuing medications that are no longer necessary.

14:00 – 15:15

B02

Pain Management in the Geriatric Population

David Lussier, Université de Montréal and Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Review of pharmacologic changes associated with aging, as well as practical tips on how to prescribe various analgesics in older patients, in order to obtain proper pain control and fewer adverse effects.

15:45 – 17:00

C02

The Therapeutic Use of Cannabis

Mark Ware, Alan Edwards Pain Management Unit, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

The medical use of cannabis is a topic of great interest to the public and health care professionals alike. This session will review some of the issues and opportunities that clinicians working in palliative care will face regarding this controversial topic.
11:00 – 12:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (A01 or A02) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (A03 – A12)
A01
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Fundamentals of Palliative Care Nursing

(Part 1)

A02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care

(Part 1 – Presented in English

A03
PROFFERED PAPERS – Pediatric Palliative Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) A Complex Palliative Care Journey: A Qualitative Investigation of the Death of One Twin in the Perinatal Period

Sarah Meaney1, Paul Corcoran1, Keelin O'Donoghue2

1. National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
2. University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

B) The Spiritual Challenge of Perinatal Bereavement

Daniel Nuzum1, 2, Sarah Meaney3, Keelin O'Donoghue1, 2

1. University College Cork, Cork, Ireland
2. Cork University Maternity Hospital, Cork, Ireland
3. National Perinatal Epidemiology Centre, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland

C) Only You Would Know: Bereaved Parent Volunteers Offering Support to Recently Bereaved Parents

Lori Malazich1, Carol May1, Scott Maurer1, 2

1. Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, PA, United States
2. University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, United States

D) The End-of-Life Spiritual Care Service Package in the Newborn Intensive Care Unit(s)

Marzieh Hasanpour1, Narges Sadeghi2, Mohamad Heidarzadeh3, 4

1. Tehran University of Medical Sciences,Tehran, Iran
2. Islamic Azad University, Isfahan, Iran
3. Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran
4. Ministry of Health, Treatment and Medical Education, Tehran, Iran

A04

A) When the Personal Meets the Professional and How Music Can Help

Viv Lucas1, Bob Heath1, 2

1. Garden House Hospice, Letchworth Garden City, Hertfordshire, United Kingdom
2. Maggie's Centre, Cheltenham, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom

A palliative care physician works with a music therapist to explore the use of creative song writing in supporting the care of patients and those that care for them.

B) Awakening Empathy: Using Sociodrama in Communication Training

Katie Neuendorf, Flannery Fielding, Center for Excellence in Healthcare Communication, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, United States

This workshop allows participants to deepen their empathetic perspective while practicing sociodrama skills, such as doubling and role-reversal. A comprehensive debrief will highlight the rationale for these methods in communication skills training.

A05

A) How Do We Keep Volunteers Smiling? Exploring Supportive Strategies for the Palliative Care Team

Patrick Durivage11, Anna Feindel2, Zelda Freitas1, 2, Isabelle Van Pevenage1, members of the Council on Palliative Care2

1. CREGES, CIUSSSS Centre-Ouest-de-l'Ile-de-Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Council on Palliative Care, Université McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada

This workshop is intended for volunteers, coordinators and interdisciplinary teams. In subgroups, participants will exchange on issues related to the management of volunteers: recruitment, selection, training, supervision, evaluation and retention. A self-care exercise will conclude this workshop.

B) Dying Is Social: Lessons from the Volunteers in the Pallium India Model

Grace Taylor3, Ann Broderick2, Joann Eland2, M.R. Rajagopal1

1. Pallium India, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India
2. University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, United States
3. Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, United States

Pallium volunteers provide a social framework for patients and providers, sometimes performing tasks of nurses or social workers. Can this model bring dying from an institutional to a social context?

A06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Education

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Memorable Learning and Professional Identity Formation in Palliative Care: A Study of Canadian Family Medicine Residents

Frances Kilbertus1, Rola Ajjawi2, Douglas Archibald3

1. Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
2. University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland
3. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

B) New Directions in Communication Skills Training for Palliative Care Fellow-Physicians

Stéfanie Gingras1, Christopher J. MacKinnon1, 2, Sonia Skamene1

1. McGill University Health Center, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Towards Skilled Feedback on Challenging Conversations – A Simulation-Based Faculty Workshop

Amanda Roze des Ordons1, Jonathan Gaudet1, Adam Cheng1, James Downar2

1. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

A07

A) Using a Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) Approach in the Provision of Palliative Care

Blair Henry1, 2, Naheed Dosani3, 4, 5, Lise Huyhn1

1. Sunnybrook Health Sciences, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. William Osler Health System, Brampton, ON, Canada
4. Palliative Education and Care for the Homeless, Toronto, ON, Canada
5. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

Underserved populations experience a disproportionate decrease in access to all health resources in spite of poorer health outcomes and some would argue, higher need. Enhanced education and understanding of the impact that social determinant of health can have on access needs to be addressed. This workshop aims to identify the impact SDOH have on palliative care services itself and to introduce an assessment tool, designed specifically with palliative care in mind, to assist clinicians in proactively assessing barriers and biases and providing patients with resources for self-advocacy and support.

B) Goals of Care and Advance Care Planning Initiative in the Cancer Care Setting

Louise Hanvey1, Savanah Ashton1, Ruth Barker2, Mireille Lecours3, Tara Carpenter-Kellett4, Christine Power5, Robin Urquhart6

1. Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Health PEI, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada
4. Cancer Care Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
5. Eastern Health, St John's, NL, Canada
6. Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS, Canada

This workshop will explore the work of a new partnership between the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, the Canadian Hospice Palliative Care Association and four provinces in Canada – Manitoba, Prince Edward Island, Newfoundland and Labrador and Nova Scotia – in launching goals of care and advance care planning policies and programs.

A08
PROFFERED PAPERS – Communication

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Professional Nursing Boundaries: When Therapeutic Care Is in Question

Rose DeAngelis, The West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada

B) Exploring Communication at the End of Life

Laura Lewis1, Eunice Gorman1, Andrew Feron2

1. King's University College, London, ON, Canada
2. Parkwood Hospital, London, ON, Canada

C) Attitudes of Cancer Patients and Families Toward Advanced Directives

Hui-ping Chen1, Jin-xiang Li1, Yu jiang2, Chuan Zhang1, Fan Zhang1, Lan Huang1, Wei Peng1

1. West China Fourth Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
2. West China Hospital of Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

D) Perceptions of Palliative Care in Advanced Cancer: Do They Influence Receipt of Quality End-of-Life Care?

Anna Collins1, 2, Sue-Anne McLachlan3, Jennifer Philip1, 2

1. Centre for Palliative Care, St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
2. University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
3. St Vincent’s Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

A09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Technology Supporting Culturally Respectful Care

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) LivingMyCulture.ca: New Online Tool to Support Culturally Safe Care

Shane Sinclair1, 2, Glen Horst1, Mei Lan Fang7, Romayne Gallagher1, 6, Judith Sixsmith4, 7, Kelli Stajduhar3, Karen Courtney3, Shelly Cory1, Bejoy Thomas5, Vivian Collacutt5, Sandy Kwong8, Ingrid See10, Sheryl Reimer-Kirkham9

1. Canadian Virtual Hospice, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
2. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
3. University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
4. University of Northampton, Northampton, United Kingdom
5. Alberta Health Services, AB, Canada
6. Providence Health, Vancouver, BC, Canada
7. Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, Canada
8. BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC, Canada
9. Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, Canada
10. Vancouver Home Hospice Palliative Care Service, Vancouver, BC, Canada

B) Indigenous Voices: New Online Tools to Enhance Competencies for Providing Culturally Safe Care

Shelly Cory1, 2, Kali Leary2, Brenda Hearson1Carrie Bourassa3, Elder Betty McKenna1, 3, Verna Fruch5, Lori Monture5,Mary Lou Kelley6,Jeroline Smith7, Sherol Kohoko7, Audrey Logan8, Donna Loft10, Phillippa Martee9, Laurie Nicholas4

1. Canadian Virtual Hospice, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
2. CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
3. First Nations University, Regina, SK, Canada
4. MaWiw Council of First Nations, Fredericton, NB, Canada
5. Six Nations of the Grand River, ON, Canada
6. Lakehead University, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
7. Peguis First Nation, MB, Canada
8. Windsor Regional Hospital, Windsor, ON, Canada
9. Baker Lake Hospice Society, Baker Lake, NU, Canada
10. Chiefs of Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Offering 'High-Tech, High Touch' Culturally Respectful Care: A Pilot Telepalliative Care Project in Rural Alaska

Christopher Piromalli1, Stacy Kelley2, Matthew Olnes2, Christine DeCourtney2

1. Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, AK, United States
2. Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Anchorage, AK, United States

A10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Home Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) A Good Enough Death?

Roderick MacLeod1, 2, Cheryl Johnson1, Victoria Coates1, Gretel Kemp1

1. HammondCare, Sydney, NSW, Australia
2. University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

B) Navigating Conflicting Values in Palliative Home Care

Susan McClement1, 2, Marie Edwards1, Elizabeth Peter3, Kerstin Roger1

1. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
2. Manitoba Palliative Care Research Unit, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
3. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) A Palliative Care Home Support Program in New South Wales (NSW), Australia – Design and Evaluation

Roslyn Poulos2, Roderick Macleod1, 3, Damian Harkin1, Andrew Cole1, 2, Christopher Poulos1, 2

1. HammondCare, Sydney, NSW, Australia
2. University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia
3. University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia

D) Better Access to Palliative Care: The Australian Hospice@HOME Program with Global Implications

Fiona Onslow, Kim Macgowan, Emma Curnin, Hobart District Nursing Service Inc., Moonah, Tasmania, Australia

A11
PROFFERED PAPERS – Advance Care Planning

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Swe-ACP: Developing and Testing Tools for Structured Conversations About Values and Priorities for Future End-of-Life Care

Olav LIndqvist1, 2, Carol Tishelman1, 3, Malin Henriksson1, 4

1. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
3. Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
4. Luleå University, Luleå, Sweden

B) From Knowledge-to-Action: A Synthesis of Barriers and Facilitators to Advance Care Planning Policy Implementation Across a Healthcare System

Jessica Simon1, Marta Shaw1, Patricia Biondo1, Jayna Holroyd-Leduc1, Sara Davison2, Eric Wasylenko1, Sunita Ghosh2, Jonathan Howlett1, Lauren Hutchinson3, Reanne Booker3, Nancy Marlett1, Shelley Raffin1, Konrad Fassbender2, Neil Hagen1

1. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
2. University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
3. Alberta Health Services, AB, Canada

C) Identification of Indicators to Monitor Successful Implementation of Advance Care Planning Policies in Alberta: A Delphi Study

Konrad Fassbender1, Jayna Holroyd-Leduc3, Patricia Biondo3, Malcena Stalker2, Alex Potapov2, Eric Wasylenko4, Max Jajszczok4, Jessica Simon3, Neil Hagen3

1. Covenant Health Palliative Institute, Edmonton, AB, Canada
2. University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada
3. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
4. Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada

D) Project to Improve Quality of Death and Dying for Patients in a University Hospital

Juli Moran, Sarah Charlton, Daryl Jones, Austin Health, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia

A12
Présentations courtes – Soins palliatifs au Congo

Une série d’exposés de 15 minutes suivis d’une période de questions de 5 minutes.

A) La valeur probante d’un testament oral du patient en soins palliatifs après sa mort, réalités à Kinshasa

Jean Sampert Makassi Kitapindu-Kimweti, ASBL Palliafamilli, Kinshasa, Kinshasa, RD Congo


B) Soins palliatifs chez les Personnes Vivants avec le VIH(PVV) en situation pénitentiaire, nécessite d’une formation professionnelle. Point de vue d’un juriste congolais

Alain Kabemba Mbaya, Damas Kasonga Kananga, Pallia Familli, Kinshasa, Kinshasa, RD Congo


C) RDC: les soins palliatifs, une dynamique communautaire

René Lukoji Kalonji, Pallia Familli, Barreau de Kinshasa, Gombe, Kinshasa, RD Congo


D) Expérience de la clinique psy dans la prise en charge des patients palliatifs à Kinshasa

Etienne Yuma1, 2, 3, 4, Jean-Claude Mukanzo4, Augustin Mamba4, Timothée Kamanga4

1. Pallia Familli, Kinshasa, RD Congo
2. Institut Supérieur des Techniques Médicales d'Ipamu, Mangai, Kwilu, RD Congo
3. Institut Supérieur des Techniques Médicales de Kinshasa, Kinshasa, RD Congo
4. Cliniques Psy, Kinshasa, RD Congo

12:30 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK / PAUSE-MIDI
OPTIONAL NETWORKING LUNCH
12:40 – 13:50

Dramatic Reading of Sophocles' Philoctetes

The New York theatrical company Outside the Wire presents a reading of the ancient Greek play Sophocles' Philoctetes as a catalyst for town hall discussions about the challenges faced by communities, patients, caregivers, and medical professionals who work in the fields of palliative care, hospice, geriatrics, and nursing. The selected scenes from the play present emotionally charged, ethically complex situations involving suffering patients and conflicted caregivers providing an ancient perspective on contemporary medical issues. The reading will be followed by a discussion.

Discussants: Suzanne O'Brien, Hope & Cope, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal
Balfour Mount, Professor Emeritus in Palliative Medicine, McGill University, Montréal

Sponsored by Hope & Cope and Palliative Care McGill.

13:00 – 13:50

Negotiating a ‘Good Enough’ Death in Acute Care Contexts: Implications for Students in Palliative Care

Marian Krawczyk, Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, St. Paul’s Hospital, Vancouver, BC, Canada

This Forum will review research findings addressing the tensions between the real and ideal in acute palliative care provision and research. Focus will be placed on the needs and priorities of students who are engaging in graduate level research and in health care professional training programs in palliative care.

14:00 – 15:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (B01 or B02) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (B03 – B12)
B01
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Fundamentals of Palliative Care Nursing

(Part 2)

B02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care

(Part 2)

B03
PROFFERED PAPERS – Pediatric Palliative Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) 'But Wait, There’s More!' Courageous Parents Network (CPN), the Digital Ginsu Steak Knife of Pediatric Palliative Care

Patricia O’Malley1,2,3, Blyth Lord3

1. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States
2. Massachusetts General Hospital for Children, Boston, MA, United States
3. Courageous Parents Network, Newton, MA, United States

B) Tensions at the End of Life in Pediatrics: Actors, Causes, Coping Strategies and Remedies

Antoine Payot, Marie-Anne Archambault-Grenier, Marie-Hélène Roy-Gagnon, Nago Humbert, Sanja Stojanovic, Annie Janvier, Michel Duval, University of Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Maintaining Professional Boundaries: Lessons from “Best Practice” Health Care Providers

Betty Davies1,7, Rose Steele2, Guenther Krueger3, Susan Albersheim4, Harold Siden4, Susan Cadell5, Caron Strahlendorf4, Jennifer Baird6

1. University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada
2 York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Child and Family Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada
4. Children’s and Women’s Health Centre of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
5. Renison University College - University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
6. Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, United States
7. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

D) What Do We Know About Pediatric Palliative Care Patients Who Consult the Emergency Department?

Nathalie Gaucher, Nago Humbert, France Gauvin, CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, QC, Canada

B04

Evidence-based Treatment of Breathlessness in Palliative Care

David Currow, Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia

Breathlessness is highly prevalent in palliative care. The evidence base to treat it continues to develop. This workshop will consider the pharmacological and health services interventions that are demonstrating benefits for patients.

B05

A) Enhancing Communication Skills in Palliative Care: Employing Carrots Rather Than Sticks

Elaine Stevens1, Elizabeth Clark2,3, Bridget Johnston4, Sharon Ruckley5

1. University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland
2. Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, United States
3. Albert Einstein College of Medicine Bronx, Bronx, NY, USA
4. University of Nottingham, Nottingham, England
5. Provincial Integrated Palliative Care Programme, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada

This interactive workshop will appeal to anyone interested in communication skills training. Facilitators will discuss issues that prevent the enhancement of communication skills before solutions to the challenges are offered.

B) New Frontiers in Communication Skills Education

Elizabeth Clark1,2, Elaine Stevens3, Bridget Johnston4, Marcos Montagnini5,6, Sharon Ruckley7

1. Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY, United States
2. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, United States
3. University of West Scotland, Paisley, Scotland, United Kingdom
4. The University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom
5. University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
6. VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System, Ann Arbor, MI, United States
7. Provincial Palliative Care Centre, Charlottetown, PEI, Canada

This workshop will present several innovative programs to teach palliative care communications skills that can be used with a range of learners in a variety of clinical settings.

B06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Clinical Issues

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) The Transplant Palliative Care Clinic: An Early Palliative Care Model for Patients in a Transplant Program with Non-Malignant Disease

Kirsten Wentlandt1,2, Ebru Kaya11,2

1. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada

B) The Prevalence and Intensity of People’s Physical Symptoms at the Time That Dying Was Diagnosed: A Prospective Cohort Study

Katherine Clark1,2, Alanna Connolly3, Sabina Clapham3, Karen Quinsey3, David Currow4

1. Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, NSW, Australia
2. The University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia
3. University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
4. Flinders University, Adelaide, SA, Australia

C) Symptomatology of Cancer Related Fatigue and Impact on Quality of Life in Patients on Palliative Care in a Tertiary Cancer Institute: A Prospective Observational Study

Arunangshu Ghoshal, Anuja Damani, MaryAnn Muckaden, Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai, India

B07

A) Applying Balint Work in Palliative Care

Rotem Tellem1, Jeffrey L. Sternlieb2, Nicky Quinlan3

1. Tel Aviv Medical Center, Tel Aviv, Israel
2. Lehigh Valley Health Network, PA, United States
3. On Lok Lifeways PACE, San Jose, CA, United States

Balint is a unique reflective method focused on the relationship between providers and patients. The workshop explores its concepts, allows firsthand Balint experience and describes Balint implementation in palliative care.

B) Building the Future of Palliative Care: Mentoring Our People

Donna S. Zhukovsky1, Eduardo Bruera1, MR Rajagopal2,3,4, Gary Rodin5,6

1. The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States
2. Trivandrum Institute of Palliative Sciences, Kerala, India
3. WHO Collaborating Centre for Training and Policy on Access to Pain Relief, Kerala, India
4. Arumanan Hospital, Kerala, India
5. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
6. Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON, Canada

By the end of the session, it is anticipated that participants of diverse backgrounds and experience will have an improved understanding of the role that mentorship can play in professional development, ways to access local and distant mentors and how to mutually benefit from mentor-mentee relationships.

B08
PROFFERED PAPERS – Compassionate Communities

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Jump on the Bus! Palliative Care Is “Everyone’s Business”

Denise Marshall1,2, Kathy Kortes-Miller1, José Pereira1, Srini Chary1, Kathryn Downer1

1. Pallium Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

B) Going Public: Integrating Palliative Care, Health Promotion and Public Health in Sweden Through the DöBra Research Program

Carol Tishelman1,2, Olav Lindqvist1,3

1. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2. Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden
3. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden

C) Compassionate Communities: How Do We Get There?

Eman Hassan1, Terry Webber1, Doris Barwich1, 2

1. BC Centre for Palliative Care, New Westminster, BC, Canada
2. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

B09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Spirituality

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Sacred Stories and Human Suffering: A Palliative Approach to Chaplaincy

Aaron Klink, , Pruitt Hospice, Durham, NC, United States

B) Mobilizing the Gaelic Mindfulness of John O’Donohue for Presence in Palliative Care Practice

Sheryl Shermak, University of Victoria, Victoria; Island Health, Port Alberni, BC, Canada

C) Gaelic Rituals Around Death and Dying - The Concept of 'Home'

Mark Sheridan1, Maria McGill2, Mark Hazelwood3

1. University of the Highlands and Islands, Inverness, Scotland, United Kingdom
2. Childrens Hospice Association Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom
3. Scottish Partnership for Palliative Care, Edinburgh, Scotland, United Kingdom

B10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Family Caregivers

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Primary Caregivers’ Experiences of Caring for Patients Under Hospice Care at Home

Jacek Soroka, Mayo Clinic Health System, Mankato, MN, United States and International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

B) The Moral Ambivalence of Informal Care for the Dying: A Qualitative Study of Carers' Experiences at the End of Life

Alex Broom, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia

C) Why Not Ask the Experts? Family Caregivers' Experiences of Providing Palliative and End-of-Life Care

Lisa Williams, Tess-Moeke Maxwell, Stella Black, Gabriella Trussardi, Janine Wiles, Merryn Gott, Ngaire Kerse, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand

D) Current and Bereaved Caregiver Perceptions of a Psychoeducation Program

Pamela Durepos1,5,6, Sharon Kaasalainen1, Sandra Carroll2,3, Alexandra Papaioannou1,4

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3. Population Health Research Institute, Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4. GERAS Centre, Hamilton Health Sciences / St Peter's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada
5. Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network, Kingston, ON, Canada
6. Shalom Village Nursing Home, Hamilton, ON, Canada

B11
PROFFERED PAPERS – Research Methods

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Development of an instrument to Assess Psycho-social Spiritual Healing: The NIH HEALS

Ann Berger, Danetta Hendricks Sloan, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, United States

B) So an Anthropologist Walks into a Palliative Care Unit…

Marian Krawczyk, Centre for Health Evaluation and Outcome Sciences, Vancouver, BC, Canada; Trinity Western University, Langley, BC, Canada; Technology Evaluation in the Elderly Network, Kingston, ON., Canada

C) Introduction to Rasch Measurement Methodology

Bruno Gagnon1,2,3, Giovani G. Arcuri4,5, Amel Baghdadli1,3

1. Centre de recherche clinique et évaluative en oncologie, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Centre de recherche sur le cancer, Québec, QC, Canada
3. Laval University, Québec, QC, Canada
4. Royal Victoria Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
5. McGill University, Montréal, QC Canada

B12
Atelier et présentations courtes – La fin de vie

Un atelier de 45 minutes, et deux exposés de 15 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 5 minutes

A) La physiologie de la fin de vie

Patrick Vinay, professeur émérite, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Les changements physiologiques en fin de vie causent : 1-Une déplétion en NO dans l’air inspiré, réduisant l’adaptation aux obstructions intra-bronchiolaires. 2-Une hypoalbuminémie réduisant la production métabolique de CO2 avec des pauses respiratoires. 3-Une sécrétion accrue d’ADH exagérant les douleurs tumorales. 4-Une baisse des endorphines imposant un apport accru d’opioïdes pour supprimer la douleur croissante du malade.

B) Survie des patients atteints de cancers solides incurables : validation externe prospective d’un score pronostique

Delphine Prénat-Molimard1, Anne Perroziello1, Charles Joussellin1, Benoit Molimard2, Bénédicte De Corbière3

1. CHU Bichat, Paris, France
2. Hôpital d'instruction des armées Bégin, St Mandé, France.
3. CHU Beaujon, Clichy, France.

C) Participation des proches aux toilettes mortuaires : analyse des pratiques dans 2 USP

Marion Broucke1, Bernard Devalois2, Johann Chatain1,2, Martine Trouillet2

1. CHU Paris Sud, site Paul Brousse, Villejuif, France
2. CH René Dubos, Pontoise, France

15:30 – 16:00 – BREAK / PAUSE

16:00 – 17:00
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (C01 or C02) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (C03 – C12)
C01
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pediatric Palliative Care – Day 2

(Part 1)

C02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR / SÉMINAIRE SPÉCIAL

Fundamentals of Palliative Care Nursing / L’ABC des soins infirmiers palliatifs

(Part 1 – Presented in English / 1re partie – présentée en anglais)

C03

Improving Respiratory Symptoms in Children with Severe Neurological Impairment: Beyond Anticholinergics and Morphine

Julie Hauer, Shih-Ning Liaw, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, United States

This session will highlight triggers for respiratory symptoms that are unique to individuals with neurological impairment (e.g. muscle spasms, dysautonomia, overfeeding). Strategies to manage this frequent symptom will be reviewed.

C04

Transforming Moral Distress into Moral Resilience

Cynda Rushton, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, United States

Moral distress is a pervasive experience of clinicians caring for people with life-threatening conditions. The literature is replete with evidence of the incidence and source of moral distress with fewer methods for mitigating the detrimental effects. This session will explore the background of moral distress and offer a promising method for cultivating moral resilience in response to the inevitable moral distress clinicians confront. A conceptual model and methods for building moral resilience will be discussed.

C05

The History of Pain

Joanna Bourke, Birkbeck College, University of London, London, United Kingdom

Figurative languages are central to all attempts at communicating unpleasant sensations to oneself as well as to others. Pain-talk is swollen with metaphor, simile, metonym, and analogy. Why are such linguistic devices so crucial to painful experiences? Can the exploration of the figurative or metaphorical languages of pain enable us to speculate on what pain “actually feels like”?

C06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Arts & Humanities

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Integrating Arts Into Palliative Care: Reshaping Maslow’s Pyramid

Patricia Repar, Lisa Marr, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, United States

B) Examining Lived Experiences of Singing in a Bereavement Support Music Therapy Group

Laurel Young1, Adrienne Pringle2

  1. Concordia University, Montréal, QC, Canada
  2. Carpenter Hospice, Burlington, ON, Canada

C) The Effects of Music Therapy Interventions on Symptom Management in Palliative Medicine Patients

Lisa Gallagher1,2, Ruth Lagman2

  1. Cleveland Clinic Arts and Medicine Institute, Cleveland, OH, United States
  2. Cleveland Clinic Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland, OH, United States

C07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care in Developing Countries

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Palliative Care in Post Complex Humanitarian Crisis: Experiences from Rwanda Post-Genocide Society

Christian Ntizimira1, Magnus Gasana3, Olive Mukeshimana2, Scholastique Ngizwenayo2

  1. Rwanda Palliative Care and Hospice Organisation, Kigali, Rwanda
  2. Kibagabaga Hospital, Kigali, Rwanda
  3. University Teaching Hospital (CHUK), Kigali, Rwanda

B) The 2015 Quality of Death Index – Why We Rank Second Last?

Rumana Dowla, Bangladesh Palliative and Supportive Care Foundation and United Hospital, Dhaka, Bangladesh

C) Integrating Palliative Care in Health System in Developing Countries: Case (Example) of Rwanda

Diane Mukasahaha, Marie Aimee Muhimpundu, Jean Claude Tayari, Rwanda Biomedical Center, Ministry of Health, Kigali, Rwanda

C08
PROFFERED PAPERS – Clinical Issues

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Pilot Study of a MEdication RAtionalization (MERA) Intervention

Rachel Whitty1,2, Ellen Koo1, Sandra Porter1, Kiran Battu1, Csilla Kalocsai3, Pranjal Bhatt2, Kendra Delicaet1, Gary Wong1,2, Robert Wu1,2, Isaac Bogoch1,2, James Downar1,2

  1. University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
  2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
  3. Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, ON, Canada

B) Psychotropic and Narcotic Drug Use in Older Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer Across the Cancer Care Trajectory

Sue-Ling Chang1, Ania Syrowatka1, Nancy Mayo1, Robyn Tamblyn1, Ari Meguerditchian1,2

  1. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
  2. McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Decision-Making of Treatment In Advanced Lung Cancer: Results from the First Three Stages of the PACT Study (An Intervention to Support Advanced Lung Cancer Patients and Their Clinicians When Considering Systemic Anti-Cancer Therapy)

Despina Anagnostou1, Anthony Byrne1, Stephanie Sivell1, Catherine Sampson1, Simon Noble1, Jason Lester2, Annmarie Nelson1

  1. Cardiff University, Cardiff, United Kingdom
  2. Velindre Hospital, Velindre NHS Trust, Cardiff, United Kingdom

C09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Communication / Hope

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Language and Its Implications: How Do We Introduce Palliative Care to Patients with Advanced Cancer?

Jennifer Philip, Anna Collins, Centre for Palliative Care, St Vincent’s Hospital, and University of Melbourne, VIC, Australia

B) “This is kind of like the last hope”: Caregivers' Experience in Decision-Making When Palliative Cancer Patients Are Enrolled in Phase 1 Clinical Trials.

Naomi Kogan1, Michelle Dumas2, S. Robin Cohen3

  1. Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
  2. Independent Researcher, Montréal, QC, Canada
  3. Lady Davis Institute, Sir Mortimer B. Davis Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Embodying Ambiguous Spaces of Living <=>Dying: Everyday Life with Metastatic Breast Cancer as a Chronic Health Condition

Sheryl Shermak, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada.

C10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Whole Person Care

Two 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Towards a Global and Culturally Sensitive Understanding of Spiritual Care: An International Study of Patients’ and Family Members’ Views and Experiences of Spiritual Care Across 9 Countries

Lucy Ellen Selman1, Shane Sinclair2, Ikali Karvinen3, Mieke Vermandere4, Myra Glajchen5, Christina Puchalski6, Nancy Gikaara7, Joy Hunter8, Richard A. Powell9, Ewa Deskur10, Jinsun (Sr. Juliana) Yong11, On behalf of the InSpirit Collaborative

  1. King's College London, Cicely Saunders Institute, London, United Kingdom
  2. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
  3. Diaconia University of Applied Sciences, Helsinki, Finland
  4. KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium
  5. MJHS Hospice and Palliative Care, New York, NY, United States
  6. The George Washington University, Washington, DC, United States
  7. Nairobi Hospice, Nairobi, Kenya
  8. University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa
  9. MWAPO Health Development Group, Nairobi, Kenya
  10. Poznan University of Medical Sciences, Poznan, Poland
  11. The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Republic of Korea

B) Compassionate Care: Bridging the Gap Between Theory and Practice

Shane Sinclair1, Thomas F. Hack2, Susan McClement2, Shelley Raffin-Bouchal1

  1. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
  2. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada

C11
Présentations courtes – La souffrance psychologique

Deux exposés de 20 minutes chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 10 minutes.

A) Les défis de la souffrance existentielle à l’ère de l’aide médicale à mourir : la prévenir, la reconnaître, la prendre en charge

Marie-Christine Carrier1, Andréanne Côté1, 2

  1. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
  2. Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

B) Mieux comprendre la souffrance psychologique des hommes âgés atteints d'un cancer incurable : le point de vue des intervenants

Valérie Bourgeois-Guérin1, Antonin Marquis1, Rock-André Blondin1, Isabelle Van Pevenage3, Patrick Durivage2

  1. Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
  2. C.S.S.S. Cavendish, Montréal, QC, Canada
  3. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

C12

Le «stabat femina» en soins palliatifs

Luce Des Aulniers, Marie Lefebvre, Université du Québec à Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

Stabat : se tenir, tenir bon, ensemble et avec, fondement de toute institution. Au sein du mouvement des soins palliatifs, comment le féminin - par quelques figures méconnues - contribue-t-il au principe «institution», dans le devenir même des sociétés? Exposé accompagné de la prestation d’une artiste du corps, suivi de discussion.

17:00 - 18:30

A special time slot dedicated to viewing the posters and meeting the authors.