Wednesday, October 3, 2018
07:00 – 08:00
Self-Care Activities
07:45 – 08:45
Chair: David K. Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Discussant: Sheila Payne, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom
A) Volunteer Involvement in the Organisation of Palliative Care: Results from a Large-Scale Survey of Healthcare Organisations in Flanders and Brussels
Steven Vanderstichelen1,2, Joachim Cohen1, Yanna Van Wesemael3, Luc Deliens1,2, Kenneth Chambaere1,2
1. Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium; 2. Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; 3. Palliabru, Brussels, Belgium
B) The Involvement of Cancer Patients in the Four Stages of Decision-making in Continuous Sedation Until Death
Lenzo Robijn1,2, Jane Seymour3, Luc Deliens1,2, Ida Korfage4, Jayne Brown5, Peter Pype1,2, Agnes van der Heide4, Kenneth Chambaere1,2, Judith Rietjens4
1. Vrije Universiteit Brussel & Ghent University, Brussels, Belgium; 2. Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium; 3. University of Sheffield, Sheffield, United Kingdom; 4. Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam, the Netherlands; 5. De Montfort University, Leicester, United Kingdom
C) Peer-facilitated Public Sessions as a Strategy to Increase Engagement in Advance Care Planning in British Columbia
Peter HudsonRachel Carter1,2, Eman Hassan1, Doris Barwich1,2, Jennifer Kryworuchko2, Lawrence Mroz2, Shimae Soheilipour2, Richard Sawatzky3,4, Jessica Simon5, Arminee Kazanjian2
1. BC Centre for Palliative Care, New Westminster, BC, Canada; 2. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3. Trinity Western University, Vancouver, BC Canada; 4. Providence Health Care Research Institute, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 5. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
09:00 – 10:30
Chair : TBD

End-of-Life Issues Around the World: Gathering Up the Possibilities

David Clark, Professor of Medical Sociology, School of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Glasgow, Dumfries, Scotland, United Kingdom


Around the world there is increasing interest in end-of-life issues, as the global population ages and grows. In an attempt to make sense of these challenges, the Glasgow End of Life Studies Group has conceptualised a 10-point taxonomy of relevant interventions, defined as ‘organized responses to end-of-life issues’. It opens up the debate about end-of-life interventions in new ways to provide protagonists, activists, policy makers, clinicians, researchers and educators with a comprehensive framework in which to place their endeavours and more effectively assess their efficacy.

The Fireplace: Death, Grief & Healing as a Process of Rebirth

Okello Kelo Sam, Former child soldier, Founder of Hope North Uganda, Masindi, Uganda


As one of the tens of thousands of young Ugandans who have been abducted and forced to become child soldiers, Okello Kelo Sam experienced death and loss first-hand. Believing that every child deserves a bright future, he established a school to facilitate the healing of Acholi youth. Hope North is “a school, a home, and a promise” where thousands of orphans, former child soldiers, and young victims of Uganda’s civil war have achieved peace and success through education, inspiration, and personal development. Okello will speak about the power of "doing", and of "community", in dealing with death, and healing.

10:30 – 11:00 – BREAK

11:00 – 17:30

WHAT TO CHOOSE FROM:


At 11:00 participants may attend either the Special Seminar “Special Topics in Palliative Care Nursing” (A01/B01/C01), or the Special Seminar “Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care” (A02/B02/C02), or the Special Seminar “Challenges and Solutions for Palliative Care Research” (A03/B03/C03), all of which continue until 17:30; or alternatively choose from a selection of workshops at 11:00 (A04-A14), at 14:00 (B04-B14) and at 16:00 (C04-C14).

Organizers and Co-Chairs :
Vasiliki Bitzas, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
Maryse Bouvette, Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada
David Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
Exploration of different topics and issues in palliative care nursing, with a special focus on the role and experiences of caregivers, strengths-based approaches to working with patients and families, and bodily dimensions of care before and after death.

(This Seminar will be conducted in English and French with simultaneous interpretation.)

11:00 – 12:30

A01

The Value of a Strengths-Based Nursing Approach in a Palliative Care Setting

(presented in French)

Marie-Michelle Vallières-Noël and Kathia Dorcélus-Cétoute, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

B01

A) "I'd Hold the Mirror so She Could Brush Her Own Hair": Informal Caregivers' Perceptions of Their Role in Providing Personal Care in a Hospice Setting

Lorraine McPherson1,2, Stuart Milligan2, Elaine Stevens2

1. Strathcarron Hospice, Randolph Hill, Denny, Scotland
2. University of the West of Scotland, Paisley, Scotland

B) "For the Longest Time I Don't Think I Was Breathing into my Chest": Embodying Mindfulness in Palliative Care Nursing

Lacey White, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

16:00 – 17:30

C01

A) Mouth Care


Maryse Bouvette, Bruyère Continuing Care, Ottawa, ON, Canada

B) Bodily Care

Vasiliki Bitzas, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) After-Death Care

David Wright, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada

Organizers and Co-Chairs :
Andrée Néron, Centre hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
Dominique Dion, Hôpital Maisonneuve-Rosemont, CIUSSS de l’Est-de-l’Île-de-Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada


The pharmacological approach in palliative care can represent a major challenge. It must adapt to complex, unusual clinical situations that are not covered by standard guidelines. In this seminar, experts will discuss the latest data on a variety of subjects, such as cannabinoids, optimizing medication in specific clinical situations, appropriate use of thromboprophylaxis, and the multimodal approach to constipation.

11:00 – 12:30

A02

Current and Future Therapies: A Global Approach to Constipation in Palliative Care – What the Clinician Should Know Before Prescribing

Alain Watier, Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canadas

Tanya Gutierrez, Clinique Pelvi-Santé, Brossard, QC, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

B02

Thromboprophylaxis in Palliative Care

Vicky Tagalakis, McGill University Health Centre, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada



Challenges in Medication Management in Advanced (but Not Terminal) Illness – At Home

Mary Lynn McPherson, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States

16:00 – 17:30

C02

Challenges in Medication Management in Advanced (but Not Terminal) Illness – In Hospital

Mary Lynn McPherson, University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States

Cannabinoids in Clinical Practice: From Bench to Bedside

Danial Schecter, Cannabinoid Medical Clinic, Toronto, ON, Canada

Organizers and Co-Chairs :
Robin Cohen, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
James Downar, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
This seminar will address some of the specific challenges in conducting palliative care research and introduce participants to methodologies and methods well suited to meeting these challenges. With plenty of time for discussion, the seminar provides a rare opportunity for researchers and invited speakers to discuss together the problems we face and solutions we’ve found to conducting quantitative, qualitative, and multi-site research in palliative care.

11:00 – 12:30

A03

Challenges in Conducting Quantitative Research on P/EOL


Hsien Seow, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada

14:00 – 15:30

B03

Interpretive Description: A Practice-based Qualitative Methodology


Sally Thorne, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

16:00 – 17:30

C03

Research Collaboratives and Clinical Trials Groups: Keys to Success and Avoiding Pitfalls


David Currow, IMPACCT, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, Australia

Sheila Payne, International Observatory on End of Life Care, Lancaster University, Lancaster, United Kingdom

11:00 – 12:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (A01, A02 or A03) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (A04 – A14)
A01
F=>E
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Special Topics in Palliative Care Nursing

(Part 1)

A02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care

(Part 1)

A03
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Research Methodology

(Part 1)

A04
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Pediatric Palliative Care

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Are You Ready to Meet the Pediatric Palliative Care Needs of the Future?

Jayne Grant1, Deborah McGirr2, Cari Malcom2

1. Children's Hospices Across Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland
2. Napier University, Edinburgh, Scotland

A dynamic and interactive workshop where delegates will have the opportunity to discuss and debate the implications of an education scoping exercise to improve children and young people's palliative care practice.

B) Caring for a Child with a Complex Chronic Condition: Parent-Reported Burden and Quality of Life

Andrea Postier1, Alison Kolste1, Craig Schulz2, David Watson1, Nikki Braaten1, Kris Catrine1,2, Stefan Friedrichsdorf1,2

1. Children's Hospitals and Clinics of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States
2. University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, United States

C) Exploring Fathers' Experiences of Living with a Child Who Has a Life Shortening Condition. A Phenomenological Approach

Nicky Bridges, Children's Hospices Across Scotland, Scotland

A05
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Death Preparedness and Anticipatory Loss

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Integrating Anxiety Management Techniques into Palliative Care

Therese A. Rando, The Institute for the Study and Treatment of Loss, Warwick, RI, United States

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Caregivers can be helpful in alleviating the anxious distress of patients in palliative care and their families/friends by integrating clinical and evidenced-based anxiety management techniques into their work. Many of these are quick and easy interventions that can offer substantial relief. This workshop will identify a variety of effective ones.

B) How Do Family Caregivers Prepare for Death and Bereavement in Dementia? A Concept Analysis

Pamela Durepos1,2, Sharon Kaasalainen1, Jenny Ploeg1, Tamara Sussman3, Noori Akhtar-Danesh1

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Understanding the Last Days and Hours of Life Using Narrative Inquiry: Stories of Family and Friends

Kathleen Charlebois1, David Kenneth Wright2, Susan Law3

1. St.Mary's Research Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. Institute for Better Health-Trillum Health Partners, Mississauga, ON, Canada

A06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Arts and Humanities

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) The Narrative Effects of the Haiku-based Poetry Technique in Palliative Care

Alfonso Santarpia, Aix-Marseille Université, Aix-en-Provence, France

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B) The Effect of a Dharma Creative Art Therapy Program Among Cancer Patients Receiving Palliative Care

Sureeporn Thanasilp1, Kotchakorn Voraakhom2, Prim Pisolayabutra2, Rattana Panriansaen3, Wilailuck Tantitrakul4, Lanchasak Akkaayagorn5

1. Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand
2. Artfield Creative Therapy, Bangkok, Thailand
3. Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Thailand
4. Hospital of Excellence in Thai Traditional and Complementary Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
5. King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand

C) Can Art Change the Image of Old Age?

Sverre Chr. Wilhelmsen, Hanne Jones, Stein B. Husebø, Eirin Hillestad, Julie Tessem, Gro Helen Dale, The Dignity Center – Care for the Elderly, Bergen, Norway

D) To Go Down into the Deep Places: Gathering Wisdoms from the Artist Emily Carr to Enliven Our Healing Practices

Sheryl Shermak, Island Health, Central Vancouver Island Region and University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada

A07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Hospice / Community-Based Palliative Care

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Feasibility of Different Action-oriented Techniques Used with Patients, Family and Staff in Sweden to Improve the End-of-life Care Environment in an Action-research Project

Ida Goliath1,2, Olav Lindqvist1,3, Carol Tishelman1,4

1. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
2. Ersta Hospital, Hospice, Stockholm, Sweden
3. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden
4. Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden

B) Managing Opioids in Cancer Survivor Pain: An Ongoing Challenge

Ramandeep Kaur, Sean O'Mahony, Erin Bagwell, Rush University Medical System, Chicago, IL, United States

C) Life, Living, and Legacy: Thinking Differently About How We Approach End-of-Life Care

Michael Bennett, The Hospice of Windsor and Essex County, Inc., and University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

A08
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care for Underserved Populations

A 45-minute workshop, and a 15-minute presentation followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Living on the Fringe: Providing Palliative Care to the Homeless and Unbefriended Patient

Donna Zhukovsky1, Myra Glajchen2, Erica Wilson3

1. University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, United States
2. MJHS Institute for Innovation in Palliative Care, New York, NY, United States
3. Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, United States

Homeless individuals encounter numerous barriers to palliative care. We will describe the population, identify barriers to care, review decision-making procedures for ‘isolated’ persons and highlight strategies to facilitate end-of-life care.

B) Palliative Care for Underserved Populations in Australia: Homeless Persons. A Discourse-Historical Approach

Katrina Récoché, Margaret O'Connor, Rosemary Clerehan, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

A09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Examples of Canadian Leadership

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Palliative Care Quality Standard: Guiding Evidence-based, High-quality Palliative Care in Ontario

Lisa Ye1, Ahmed Jakda2, Melody Boyd4, Tara Walton3, Naira Yeritsyan1, Candace Tse1, Lacey Phillips1, Taylor Martin3, Deanna Bryant3

1. Health Quality Ontario, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Ontario Palliative Care Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Ontario Palliative Care Network Secretariat, Toronto, ON, Canada
4. Royal Victoria Regional Health Centre, Barrie, ON, Canada

B) The Canadian Network of Palliative Care for Children: Help Us Grow

Christina Vadeboncoeur1,2,3, Gurjit Singh4,5

1. Children's Hospital of Easten Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Roger Neilson House, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
4. Trillium Health Partners, Mississauga, ON, Canada
5. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Spreading Innovation in Palliative and End-of-life Care – Paramedics Providing Palliative Care Services

Elan Graves1, Raquel Shaw Moxam2

1. Canadian Foundation for Healthcare Improvement, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Canadian Partnership Against Cancer, Toronto, ON, Canada

D) Caring for People at the End of Life and for the Health System: Reflection from a Social Worker Three Years after the Adoption of the Law Concerning End-of-Life Care in Québec

Patrick Durivage1, Zelda Freitas1, Patricia Friesen1, Bilkis Vissandjee2

1. Centre de recherche et d'expertise en gérontologie sociale, CIUSSS du Centre-Ouest-de-l'Îlede-Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

A10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Psychosocial Issues

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Suffering, Hope and Healing: Psychotherapeutic and Ethical Issues at End of Life

Cheryl Nekolaichuk, University of Alberta; Palliative Institute, Covenant Health; Grey Nuns Community Hospital, Edmonton, AB, Canada

B) The Pathless Path: Psychosocial Rounds in Palliative Practice

Flannery Fielding, Cathy Luck, Kyle Neale, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, United States

C) Learning from Experiences of Feeling Heard: A Qualitative Study of Hospice Palliative Care Volunteers

Robert Mundle, Providence Care Hospital, Kingston, ON, Canadas

D) How to Promote the Integration of Volunteers in Palliative Care? Views of a Volunteer Team and a Psychologist

Philippe Laperle1, Deborah Ummel2

1. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, QC, Canada

A11
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care During Humanitarian Crises

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Approaches to Palliative Care in the Context of Humanitarian Relief: Perspectives from the Field

Elisha Waldman1, Joan Marston2, Lisa Schwartz3, Megan Doherty4

1. Lurie Children's Hospital of Chicago, Chicago, IL, United States
2. Sunflower Children's Hospice, Bloemfontein, South Africa
3. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario/Roger Neilson House, University of Ottawa, ON, Canada

A panel of clinicians involved in palliative care in the context of humanitarian aid in various settings will discuss their own experiences as well as engage the audience in discussion.

B) Palliative Care in the Post-Conflict Setting: Sri Lanka

Jonathan Pearce1,2,3, Erin Pearce3

1. Providence Health Care, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3. Two Worlds Cancer Collaboration, Parksville, BC, Canada

C) "Nothing in the World Can Serve Those People Like Palliative Care": Results from a Qualitative Study on Palliative Care for Refugees in Jordan and Rwanda

Sonya de Laat1, Olive Wahoush1, Wejdan Khater6, Emmanuel Musoni7, Ibraheem Abu-Siam8, Kevin Bezanson4, Elysee Nouvet3, Matthew Hunt2, Carrie Bernard1,5, Rachel Yantzi1, Laurie Elit1, Lynda Redwood-Campbell1, Ross Upshur5, Lisa Schwartz1

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
3. Western University, London, ON, Canada
4. Lakehead & Laurentian Universities, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
5. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
6. Jordan University of Science and Technology, Ar Ramtha, Jordan
7. University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
8. United Nations High Commission for Refugees, Jordan

A12
PROFFERED PAPERS – Programme Development

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) The Summer Student Program: An Innovative Way to Engage Teenagers to Learn About Palliative Care and Increase Their Community Involvement

Rose DeAngelis, Teresa Dellar, The West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada

B) The Freeman Centre for the Advancement of Palliative Care: Sharing an Innovative Model of Palliative Care Delivery

A.M. Nina Horvath1,2, Archna Patel1,2

1. North York General Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Palliative Care Matters: Commitment to Action Toward an Integrated Palliative Care Strategy for Canada

Konrad Fassbender1,2, Wonita Janzen2, Michelle Sims2, Carleen Brenneis2, Karen Macmillan2

1. Covenant Health, Edmonton, AB, Canada
2. University of Alberta. Edmonton, AB, Canada

D) A Centralized Management Model for Cancer Palliative Care Service Delivery: A Framework and Case Study

Mohammad Reza Sharbafchi1,4, Ahmad Reza Pourghaderi2,4, Suzanne Hojjat-Assari3,4, Homayoon Naji Esfahani1,4

1. Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2. National University of Singapore, Singapore
3. French transfusion organization, Paris, France
4. ALA Cancer Prevention and Control Center (MACSA), Tehran, Iran

A13
PROFFERED PAPERS – Care at Home

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Our Lives of Knowing, Choosing, Caring and Sustaining: Relational Understandings of Mothers and Daughters' in Advanced Illness, End of Life and Bereavement

Pamela Grassau1,2, Shauna Daly2,3, Joni Feldman4, Lisa Shishis5, Tara Tucker6,7

1. Carleton University, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Bruyère Research Institute, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. Hospice Care Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
4. Palliative Care and Geriatric Specialist Social Worker, Ottawa, ON, Canada
5. Champlain Hospice Palliative Care Program, Ottawa, ON, Canada
6. Community Palliative Care Physician, Ottawa, ON, Canada
7. Therapy for Grief, Loss, Life Transitions, Ottawa, ON, Canada

B) What Interplay of Factors Influences the Place of Death in Cancer Patients? An Innovative Probabilistic Approach Sheds Light on a Well-known Question

Heidi Kern1, Giorgio Corani2, David Huber2, Nicola Vermes2, Marco Zaffalon2

1. Associazione Triangolo, Ticino, Switzerland
2. IDSIA, Dalle Molle Institute for Artificial Intelligence, Ticino, Switzerland

C) Barriers for the Early Integration of Palliative Home Care into the Disease Trajectory of Advanced Cancer Patients: A Focus Group Study with Palliative Home Care Teams

Naomi Dhollander1, Aline De Vleminck1, Luc Deliens1,2, Simon Van Belle1,2, Koen Pardon1

1. Vrije Universiteit Brussel & Ghent University, Brussels, Belgium
2. Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium

D) The Essential Role of Emergency Department in the Implementation of End-of-Life Care in Iran

Abdolrahim Hazini1, Ensieh Ghaffari Shad2, Sona Ziaeihezarjaribi3, Hosniyeh Soleymanzadeh4

1. Firoozgar Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2. Ayatollah Kashani Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
3. Raazi Hospital, Ghaemshahr, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Mazandaran, Iran
4. Neuromusculoskeletal Research Center, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

A14
PRÉSENTATIONS COURTES ET ATELIER – Soins palliatifs précoces

Deux exposés de 15 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 5 minutes, et un atelier de 45 minutes

A) Développement des soins palliatifs précoces : difficultés et challenges

Antoine Lemaire1, Alexis Burnod2

1. Centre Hospitalier de Valenciennes, Valenciennes, France
2. Institut Curie, Paris, France

B) Consultation commune précoce oncologique et palliative dans la prise en charge des patients atteints de mélanome uvéal métastatique : à propos d'une série prospective de 60 patients.

Alexis Burnod, Lorraine Waechter, Timothee Marchal, Carole Bouleuc, Sophie Piperno,Institut Curie, Paris, France


C) Développement de partenariats cliniques pour favoriser une approche palliative intégrée en insuffisance cardiaque avancée

Anie Brisebois, Émilie Caplette, Émilie Lacharité St-Louis, Martine Lacroix, Julie Sirois Leclerc,Institut de cardiologie de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada


12:30 – 14:00
LUNCH BREAK / PAUSE-MIDI
(Lunch boxes available for pre-purchase)
12:40 – 13:50

Celebrating Innovation That Is Leading Progress in Palliative Care

Are you or your team innovators? Do you have compelling research, a best practice, an approach, a tool or resource that's made a difference?

The high-energy Innovation Hour will showcase 6 finalists making 6-minute presentations that put a premium on creativity.

The audience will help determine who is named "International Congress Innovator of the Year 2018" and receives the $1,000 prize sponsored by Canadian Virtual Hospice.



(Click here for more information)
14:00 – 15:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (B01, B02 or B03) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (B04 – B14)
B01
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Special Topics in Palliative Care Nursing

(Part 2)

B02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care

(Part 2)

B03
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Research Methodology

(Part 2)

B04
PROFFERED PAPERS – Pediatric Palliative Care - Bereavement

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) "A Legacy to My Child": The Perspectives and Opinions of Bereaved Parents as Stakeholders

Claude Julie Bourque2, Sonia Dahan1, Martin Reichherzer1, Ginette Mantha3, Annie Janvier1,2

1. Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. CHU Sainte-Justine, Montréal, QC, Canada
3. Préma-Québec, Longueuil, QC, Canada

B) The Best Memories Are the Ones We Make Together: How to Enhance Memory Making Experiences in Neonatal Palliative Care

Eilidh Grant, Evelyn Rodger, Children's Hospices Across Scotland, Scotland

C) There's a Hashtag for That: Modern Grief Support in the Age of the Internet

Erin Kwolek1,2, Megan Miller1

1. Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, AB, Canada
2. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

B05

A) A New Biography of Cicely Saunders – The Writer’s Journey

David Clark, University of Glasgow, Dumfries, Scotland, United Kingdom

Cicely Saunders – a life and legacy (Oxford University Press 2018) marks the centenary of her birth and completes my trilogy of works, which also includes the publication of Cicely Saunders’ selected letters (2002) and publications (2006). With the consolidation of the Cicely Saunders archive it has been possible to provide a more detailed and nuanced account of her life and contribution. I also draw on over 20 interviews conducted with Cicely Saunders in the last years of her life, and recorded with a posthumous biography in mind, as well as a wide range of other oral history material. Despite the richness and range of the source materials, there were many challenges involved in such a work, not least the daunting prospect of making sense of the life and contribution of a pivotal figure in the development of modern hospice and palliative care, and the field of modern health-care as a whole.

B) QELCA©: An International Collaboration to Improve Quality of Care Using a Participatory Approach to End-of-Life Education

Liz Bryan1,Rose DeAngelis2

1. St. Christopher's Hospice, London, United Kingdom
2. The West Island Palliative Care Residence, Kirkland, QC, Canada

QELCA© (Quality End of Life Care for All) is an innovation in end-of-life care education originating from St. Christopher's, London, that not only impacts on the behaviours of individual learners but empowers them to lead on significant change within their organisations.

B06

A) Mindful Journeys: An Innovative Approach to Helping and Healing for Patients and Parents of Children Facing Loss

David Steinhorn1,2,Jana Din3

1. Children's National Medical Center, Washington, DC, United States
2. George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC, United States
3. Tao Center for Healing, Sacramento, CA, United States

Participants will learn and experience how traditional, indigenous methods can help a family member move into a quiet, mindful state in which new insights can be gained regarding critical decisions.

B) "Your Hands Are Taking The Pain Away": Integrating Massage Therapy for Hospitalized Palliative Care Patients

Anne Kelemen1,Lauren Cates2,Hunter Groninger1

1. MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, United States
2. Healwell, Arlington, VA, United States

This interactive workshop will explore one institution’s experience of integrating therapeutic massage for hospitalized palliative care patients. Results from two massage studies will be discussed.

B07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care During Humanitarian Crises

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Palliative Care in the Midst of Conflict: Experiences in an Emergency Field Hospital in Northern Iraq

Anna Voeuk, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB, Canada

B) Negotiating and Navigating Access to Refugees and Residents While Researching Palliative Care in Humanitarian Crisis Situations: Results from Four Case Studies

Olive Wahoush1, Wejdan Khater6, Malek Alnajar7, Ibraheem Abu-Siam9, Sonya Delaat1, Emmanuel Musoni8, Kevin Bezanson5, Elysee Nouvet3, Carrie Bernard1,4, Laurie Elit1, Lynda Redwood Campbell1, Ross Upshar1, Rachel Yantzi1, Matthew Hunt2, Lisa Schwartz1

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
3. Western University, London, ON, Canada
4. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
5. Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Thunder Bay, ON, Canada
6. Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan
7. The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan
8. University of Rwanda, Kigali, Rwanda
9. United Nations High Commission for Refugees, Jordan

C) Palliative Care During a Humanitarian Crisis: Experience from the Rohingya Refugee Camps in Bangladesh

Megan Doherty1,2,3,4, Farzana Khan4,5

1. Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, ON, Canada
2. Roger Neilson House, Ottawa, ON, Canada
3. University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada
4. World Child Cancer, London, United Kingdom
5. Fasiuddin Khan Research Foundation, Dhaka, Bangladesh

B08
PROFFERED PAPERS – Palliative Care in Long-Term Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Palliative Care Leadership in Long-Term Care: Who Are the Leaders and What Are Their Capabilities?

Shereen Jonathan, Kathryn Pfaff, Lisa Hamilton, Elizabeth Bull, Madison Broadbent, Jean Echlin, University of Windsor, Windsor, ON, Canada

B) Implementing a Palliative Approach in Long-term Care: A Program Evaluation

Sharon Kaasalainen1, Tamara Sussman2, Genevieve Thompson5, Paulette Hunter4, Shane Sinclair6, Lorraine Venturato6, Lynn McCleary7, Patricia Strachan1, John You1, Valerie Bourgeois-Guerin9, Robin Bonifas8, Deborah Parker3

1. McMaster University, Hamilton ON, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC Canada
3. University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia
4. St Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada
5. University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, Canada
6. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada
7. Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada
8. Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, United States
9. University of Québec at Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Advance Care Planning and Goals of Care Discussions in Long-term Care: Results of a Survey of Clinician Barriers and of Power of Attorney (POA) Reports of Prior Discussions

Henry Yu-Hin Siu1, Neha Arora1, Dawn Elston1, Karla Lancaster1, Asaanth Sivajohan1, Amie Vahrmeyer2, Michelle Howard1

1. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
2. Extendicare Assist, Markham, ON, Canada

B09
PROFFERED PAPERS – Compassionate Communities

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) The Home Visit Team: Correcting the Wrong Beliefs About Cancer and Motivating Cancer Patients to Undergo Medical Treatment

Nadia Maria, Swara Mega Hazanah, Garwita Institute, Jember, East Java, Indonesia

B) hospice@HOME – A Disruptive Home-based Palliative Care Model with Universal Application

Kim Macgowan, Hobart District Nursing Service Inc., Moonah, TAS, Australia

C) Retirees, Dementia Patients and Teens – What Do They All Have in Common?

Dawn Cruchet, Karen Wagner, Madawaska Valley Hospice Palliative Care, Barry's Bay, ON, Canada

B10

A) The Power of Our Words: Cultivating Word Choice in Patient Centered Care

Terry Altilio1, Anne Kelemen2, Nneka Sederstrom3, Hunter Groninger4

1. Mount Sinai Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY, United States
2. MedStar Washington Hospital Center, Washington, DC, United States
3. Minnesota Children's Hospital, Minneapolis, MN, United States
4. Georgetown University Medical Center, Washington, DC, United States

Using patient videos, examples of chart documentation, and audience response technology, this interactive workshop engages participant consideration of unconscious bias in word choice, medical education initiatives, and institutional culture change.

B) Writing New Metaphors for Cancer and Advanced Illness

Kyra Harris1,2, Lisa Faden1

1. Western University, London, ON, Canada
2. London Health Sciences Centre, London, ON, Canada

How do healthcare providers metaphorize cancer without invoking the image of the battle, intruder, or opponent? Through collaborative creative-writing, participants in this workshop will explore new metaphors for advanced illness.

B11
PROFFERED PAPERS – Bereavement

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Grief and Medical Assistance in Dying: Lessons Learned from Oregon

Erica Srinivasan, University of Wisconsin, La Crosse, WI, United States

B) "The Pain of the Tattoo Was a Relief": Advancing a Theory of Embodied Pain in a Study of Memorial Tattoos

Susan Cadell1, Melissa Reid Lambert2, Mary Ellen Macdonald3, Deborah Davidson4, Marcel O'Gorman1, Melanie Baljko4

1. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
2. Calming Tree Counselling, Kitchener, ON, Canada
3. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
4. York University, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) 'Mourning Walk': An Innovative Bereavement Group Model

Milani Sivapragasam1,2, Alice Lehrer2, Constance Sobsey3, Suzanne O'Brien2

1. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Hope & Cope, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
3. Lady Davis Institute, Jewish General Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada

B12
PROFFERED PAPERS – Prognostic Models, Access to Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Determining the Value of Routine Palliative Prognostic Index (PPI) Calculations in a Palliative Care Unit

Darshit A. Thaker1,2, Arron Veltre1, Angela Smith1, Clinton Orth1, Bruce Stafford1

1. Redcliffe Hospital, Redcliffe, QLD, Australia
2. Royal Brisbane & Women's Hospital, Brisbane, QLD, Australia

B) The Role of Family Physicians in Palliative Care of Patients with Advanced Cancer

Christine Moon1,2, Ashley Pope1, Nadia Swami1, Ken Mah1, Laura Dawson1,2, Gary Rodin1,2, Amna Husain2,3, Camilla Zimmermann1,2

1. University Health Network, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Prognosis in Advanced Colon Cancer

Christopher Comfort, Calvary Hospital, Bronx, NY, United States

B13
Présentations courtes – Innovations

Trois exposés de 20 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 10 minutes

A) La télémédecine : un tremplin technologique pour porter la démarche palliative

Antoine Lemaire1, Jérôme Tosun2, Morgane Plançon1, Marine Mulot1

1. Centre Hospitalier de Valenciennes, Valenciennes, France
2. Centre Hospitalier Privé de Saint Grégoire, Saint-Grégoire, France

B) La fin de vie dans les USI: les pistes de solution organisationnelles, professionnelles et émotionnelles des infirmières

Diane Francoeur1, Lise Fillion2, Céline Gélinas3

1. Institut universitaire de cardiologie et de pneumologie de Québec, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
3. Université McGill, Montréal, QC, Canada

C) Consommateurs de cannabis en USP en France, quelle prise en soins ?

Adrien Evin, Emmanuelle Kuhn, Julien Nizard, Caroline Victorri-Vigneau, CHU de Nantes, Nantes, France

B14
Présentations courtes – Éducation

Trois exposés de 20 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 10 minutes

A) Interroger la fonction pédagogique des soins palliatifs : vers un apprentissage social de la fin de vie

Rozenn Le Berre, Grégory Aiguier, Institut Catholique de Lille, Lille, France

B) Évaluation des effets sur la pratique des professionnels d'une formation interprofessionnelle sur la détermination des objectifs de soins.

Gabrielle Fortin1,2,3, Serge Dumont1,3

1. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
2. Maison Michel-Sarrazin, Québec, QC, Canada
3. Réseau québécois de recherche en soins palliatifs et de fin de vie (RQSPAL), Québec, QC, Canada

C) Approche intégrative de diffusion de la démarche palliative : de dépendance-autonomie vers interdépendance

Laurent de Loynes de Fumichon, Agnès Lebrun, Philippe Guille des Buttes, Maryse Chantre, Claude Martis, Sybille Courtois, Romain Levard, Centre Hospitalier Régional, Orléans, Région Centre Val de Loire, France

15:30 – 16:00 – BREAK / PAUSE

16:00 – 17:30
CHOICE OF SPECIAL SEMINARS (C01, C02, or C03) OR CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS (C04 – C14)
C01
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Special Topics in Palliative Care Nursing

(Part 3)

C02
E=>F
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Pharmacotherapy and Palliative Care

(Part 3)

C03
SPECIAL SEMINAR

Research Methodology

(Part 3)

C04
Atelier et Présentations courtes – Soins palliatifs pédiatriquea

Un atelier de 45 minutes, et deux exposés de 15 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 5 minutes

A) Le Phare Enfants et Familles: défis et succès dans la prestation des soins de fin de vie (SDFV) en milieu communautaire

Marion Onno, Héléne Lévesque, Johanne Desrochers, Jacques Ramsay, Franco Carnevale, Le Phare, Enfants et familles, Montréal, QC, Canada

Cet atelier, axé sur les obstacles et les facilitateurs d’une prestation des soins de fin de vie pédiatriques, s’adresse aux équipes de soins impliquées en soins palliatifs en milieu communautaire.

B) « Tu n'as pas le choix; tu ne peux pas sortir parce que si tu rentres, la maladie va s'aggraver » : approche théorique d'une éthique clinique en milieu hospitalier pédiatrique négro-africain

Angèle Hermine Pondy Ongotsoyi1,2, Léopold Molel Belika1,3, Serge Patient Makak1, Grâce J. T. Nyemb Mbog2

1. Université de Yaoundé, Yaoundé, Cameroon
2. Centre Mère et Enfant/Fondation Chantal Biya, Yaoundé, Cameroon
3. Université Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Espagne

C) Exploration de l'attitude des infirmières travaillant aux soins intensifs néonatals par rapport aux soins palliatifs

Sarah St-Georges1,2, Diane Tapp2

1. Hôpital de Montréal pour Enfants, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada

C05
PROFFERED PAPERS – Home Care

Three 20-minute presentations, each followed by a 10-minute question period

A) Development and Evaluation of an Innovative Model for Augmenting Home Care Services for Palliative Clients in Rural Communities

Linda Read Paul1,2, Bev Berg1

1. Alberta Health Services, Calgary, AB, Canada
2. University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada

B) We Can See You Now: Harnessing Video Telehealth to Provide Practical Interprofessional Community Based Palliative Care Virtual Clinics

Kathryn Walker1,2, Christopher Kearney1

1. MedStar Health, Columbia, MD, United States
2. University of Maryland School of Pharmacy, Baltimore, MD, United States

C) Barriers and Facilitators on Early Integration of Home-based Palliative Care for People with Severe COPD: A Focus Group Study with General Practitioners and Community Nurses in the Context of a Phase 0-2 Trial

Charlotte Scheerens1,2, Peter Pype1,2, Simon Van Belle1,3, Guy Joos2,3, Luc Deliens1,2, Kenneth Chambaere1,2, Aline De Vleminck1,2,

1. Ghent University/VUB, Ghent, Belgium
2. Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
3. Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium

C06
PROFFERED PAPERS – Psychosocial Issues

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Rekindling Wonder in Clinical Practice

Eunice Gorman, Laura Lewis, King's University College at Western University, London, ON, Canada

B) Navigating the Intangible: Working with Non-Physical Suffering on the Front-Lines of Palliative Care

Maxxine Rattner, Wilfrid Laurier University, Kitchener, ON, and Kensington Hospice, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Relational Dimensions of Quality of Life in Inpatient Palliative Facilities

Laura Yvonne Bulk1, Gil Kimel2, Joanna Bates1, Nigel King3, Laura Nimmon1

1. The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2. St. Paul's Hospital Palliative Care Program, Vancouver, BC, Canada
3. University of Huddersfield, Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, England

C07
PROFFERED PAPERS – Education

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Palliative Care Is Part of Everyone's Job – The Education and Training Needs of Non-Specialist Palliative Care (NSPC) Practitioners; Findings from a Concept Analysis

Mary Nevin, Valerie Smith, Geralyn Hynes, Trinity College Dublin, The University of Dublin, Dublin, Ireland

B) Creating Learning Environments That Support Professional Identity Formation for Palliative Care Practice

Frances Kilbertus1, Rola Ajjawi2

1. Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Lakehead & Laurentian Universities, Sudbury, ON, Canada
2. Centre for Research in Assessment and Digital Learning, Deakin University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

C) Get Them While They Are Young: Teaching Junior Doctors About Quality Improvement (QI)

Ian Gwynne-Robson1,2, Saira Dayal2, Sisira Jayathissa2,3

1. Te Omanga Hospice, Lower Hutt, Wellington, New Zealand
2. Hutt Valley District Health Board, New Zealand

D) Exploring Resident Physicians' Experiences Practicing in Pediatric Palliative Care: A Phenomenological Method of Inquiry

Andrea Johnson1,2, Hal Siden1, Grant Charles2

1. Canuck Place Children's Hospice, Vancouver, BC, Canada
2. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada

C08
PROFFERED PAPERS – Ethical Issues

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Providing Medical Assistance in Dying Within a Home Palliative Care Program in Toronto, Canada: An Observational Study of the First Year of Experience

Joshua Wales1,2, Sarina R. Isenberg1,2, Pete Wegier1,2, Jennifer Shapiro1,2, Victor Cellarius1,2, Sandy Buchman1,2, Amna Husain1,2, Narges Khoshnood1,2

1. Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, Sinai Health System, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

B) Medical Assistance in Dying in a Pediatric Setting: Exploring the Challenges of Policy Creation

Adam Rapoport1,2,3, Randi Zlotnik Shaul1,3, Carey DeMichelis3, Virginia Scott McLaughlin3

1. Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. Emily's House Children's Hospice, Toronto, ON, Canada
3. University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada

C) Who Am I and How Am I Doing? Professional Relationships as a Source of Identity and Resilience for Palliative Care Physicians

Caitlin O'Donnell1, Anne Woods2,3, Kathleen Willison2,3, Joseph Pellizzarri2,3, Joshua Shadd3,4, Alex Farag3, Marilyn Swinton3, Andrea Frolic3

1. University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON, Canada
2. St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Hamilton, ON, Canada
3. McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada
4. St. Peter's Hospital, Hamilton, ON, Canada

D) Perspectives of Hospice Clinicians in Italy on the Current Quality of Palliative Care and the Potential Future Role for Euthanasia

Konstantinos Mastorakis1, Claudia Navarini2, Franco Carnevale1,3, Mary Ellen Macdonald1,3

1. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. European University of Rome, Rome, Italy
3. Montreal Children's Hospital, McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, QC, Canada

C09

A) Building Resilience: An Innovative Reflective Writing Method for Clinical Palliative Care – 'The 55 Word Story'

Ellen Wild1, Cory Ingram1, Lucille Marchand2

1. Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, United States
2. University of Washington, Seattle, WA, United States

55 word story is a creative writing method that fosters reflection on the lived clinical narratives common to caring for patients and families. Participants will be introduced to foundational research and content on narrative medicine. Participants will write and share their 55 word stories during the workshop.

B) Dying to Write: Narrative and Creative Story-telling in Palliative Care

Lucia Gagliese1, Dawn Gross2

1. York University, Toronto, ON, Canada
2. University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, United States

This workshop explores writing about terminal illness and bereavement as a tool for selfreflection and meaning-making about personal and professional bereavement, including readings of published narratives and a writing exercise.

C10
PROFFERED PAPERS – Leadership

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Palliative Care in Islamic Republic of Iran, Breaking One Barrier at a Time

Mahnaz M. Harrison1, Fatemeh Talebi2, Zahra Mohitabadi3, Parvaneh Shadmani4, Abdolrahim Hazini5, Hamed Sattari-Bahabadi6, Sara Aghababa7

1. Last Mile4D, Washington, DC, United States
2. 22 Bahman Hospital, Qazvin, Iran
3. Kosar Hospital, Gazvin, Iran
4. Khorshid charity, Qom, Iran
5. Firozgar Hospital, Tehran, Iran
6. Bazarganan Hospital, Tehran, Iran
7. Islamic Azad University, Tehran, Iran

This workshop will address the issues of Palliative Care in Islamic Republic of Iran, including the challenges of building coalitions, and breaking the cultural, religious, and traditional barriers, one initiative at a time.

B) Building a Global Movement of Direct Stakeholders as Advocates for Palliative Care

The Worldwide Hospice Palliative Care Alliance, London, United Kingdom

C) Keeping Focus in a Changing World: Lessons Learned on Staying True to Our Palliative Care Goals Whilst Having to Implement Changes

Peter Godden-Steele, Te Omanga Hospice, Lower Hutt, Wellington, New Zealand

C11

A) Media/Social Communication in Palliative Care: Managing PC Messages by Setting Ground Rules

José Miguel Carrasco, Carla Reigada, Alejandro Navas, Beatriz Goméz, Inés Olza, Francesc Pujol, Carlos Centeno, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain

Designed for researchers, healthcare professionals and others interested in media and social communication in Palliative Care (PC), this workshop aims to raise awareness for critical thinking on media news about PC.

B) Other Ways In: Comedy, Storytelling and the Arts

Jeannie Blaustein1, Brad Wolfe1, Dara Kosberg1, Emily Silverman2

1. Reimagine End of Life, San Francisco, CA, United States
2. Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, San Francisco, CA, United States

Drawing on comedy, physician narratives and participants' experience, this interactive workshop will demonstrate how to create widespread community-driven engagement around end-of-life issues that evokes wonder, preparation, remembrance and action steps.

C12
PROFFERED PAPERS – Neuropalliative Care

A series of 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) The Palliative Care Needs of Adult Patients and Their Informal Carers Living with Motor Neurone Disease (MND), or Bereaved Carers of People with MND: a Systematic Review of Qualitative Research

Kate Flemming1, Victoria Turner1, Ian Watt1, Bill Hulme2, Samantha Bolsher3

1. University of York, York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom
2. St Leonard's Hospice, York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom
3. Public Involvement Representative, York, North Yorkshire, United Kingdom

B) End-of-Life Care for Stroke

Shelley Jolly, Ruth Whelan, Kimberly Davy, Royal University Hospital, Saskatoon, SK, Canada

C) Who Consults a New Neuropalliative Care Service?

Jeff A. Hall1,2, Justine Gauthier1

1. Montreal Neurological Hospital, Montréal, QC, Canada
2. McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada

D) I-CoPE: A Pilot Implementation Study of a Structured Approach to Supportive Care Delivery to People with Newly Diagnosed High Grade Glioma and Their Family Caregivers

Jennifer Philip1,2,3, Anna Collins1, Jane Staker2, Michael Murphy2

1. University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
2. St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
3. Victorian Comprehensive Cancer Centre, Melbourne, VIC, Australia

C13
WORKSHOP/PROFFERED PAPERS – Spirituality

A 45-minute workshop, and two 15-minute presentations, each followed by a 5-minute question period

A) Taking Action on Spiritual Care at the End of Life in Hospital, Hospice and Home Care Settings: Barriers and Opportunities for Change

Paul Holyoke1, Barry Stephenson2, Katherine Rizzi1, Justine Giosa1

1. Saint Elizabeth Health Care, Markham, ON, Canada
2. Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John's, NL, Canada

This workshop will discuss the nine spiritual care organization-level principles and practices and framework for implementation. We will guide interactive group discussion on how attendees' organizations might use the framework to improve and expand capacity for spiritual care.

B) Exploring Awareness of Spirituality in Physicians Working in an Inpatient Specialist Palliative Care Unit

Daniel Nuzum, Marie Murphy, Marymount University Hospital and Hospice, Cork, Ireland

C) Spiritual Care at the End of Life. Does Educational Intervention Focused on a Broad Definition of Spirituality Increase Utilization of Chaplain Spiritual Support in Hospice?

Jacek Soroka, Lori Collins, Gary Creech, Gregory Kutcher, Katie Menne, Brianna Petzel, Mayo Clinic Health System, Mankato, MN, United States

C14
Présentations courtes – Soins à domicile

Une série d’exposés de 20 minutes, chacun suivi d’une période de questions de 10 minutes

A) Bien finir sa vie chez soi : une analyse comparée franco-québécoise des principaux facteurs psycho-sociaux du maintien à domicile

Tanguy Châtel1, Serge Dumont2, Andrée Sevigny2, Catherine Renard3, Patrick Durivage4, Henri De Rohan Chabot5, Anaïs Gauthier6, Johanne Desrochers7, Camille Baussant Crenn8, Alain Philippe Lemieux9, Jocelyne Wullschleger10

1. Société française d'accompagnement et de soins palliatifs, Paris, France
2. Université Laval, Québec, QC, Canada
3. Fédération de bénévoles Alliance, Bordeaux, France
4. CIUSSS Centre-Ouest de l'île de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada
5. Fondation France Répit, Lyon, France
6. Réseau de soins palliatifs Arcade, Tarbes, France
7. Le Phare, Montréal, QC, Canada
8. Hospitalisation à domicile Croix Saint Simon, Paris, France
9. Maison Michel Sarrazin, Québec, QC, Canada
10. Fondation des diaconesses de Rueilly, Versailles, France

B) Sclérose latérale amyotrophique et douleur sur l'Hôpital à Domicile de Nantes, création d'un outil

André Colpaert, Adrien Evin, Jerome Libot, Julien Nizard, CHU Nantes, Hôpital Nord Laennec, Nantes, France

17:40 - 18:10

A moment of introspection with poetry, images and live music to remember those whom we have lost.